Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer, reporter and editor, and a leader on NPR's flagship digital news team. He has frequently contributed to NPR's audio and social media platforms, including hosting dozens of live shows online.

He has gone to two Olympics for NPR (Rio and Pyeongchang), and has been the lead editor for several others. This work focused on finding the human aspect of the Games — and sharing that fascination through text, video and images on NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts.

Because of his contributions, Chappell is also named on NPR's Peabody-award winning team for its Ebola coverage. Years ago, he established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps' presence on NPR.org.

At NPR, Chappell has trained digital and radio staff in how to tell compelling stories online, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks. He was previously NPR.org's homepage editor, and has worked with shows such as Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and All Things Considered.

Prior to NPR, Chappell was an editor on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Story Archive

Mexico's defender Edson Alvarez (right) fouls Brazil's forward Neymar during the Russia 2018 World Cup round of 16 football match between Brazil and Mexico at the Samara Arena in Samara, Russia on July 2, 2018. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Candles and flowers are left at a memorial honoring four slain University of Idaho students at the Mad Greek restaurant in Moscow, Idaho, on Tuesday. Two of the victims, Madison Mogen, 21, and Xana Kernodle, 20, were servers at the restaurant. Nicholas K. Geranios/AP hide caption

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Nicholas K. Geranios/AP

Singer-songwriter Dolly Parton is the latest celebrity to receive a $100 million gift from Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, to be used for charitable purposes. Parton is seen here at the recent Rock and Roll Hall of Fame induction ceremony in Los Angeles. Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Valerie Macon/AFP via Getty Images

U.S. Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-Colo.) arrives for a news conference with members of the House Freedom Caucus on Capitol Hill in September. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Boston Bruins have cut ties with Mitchell Miller after current players and the NHL spoke out against Miller's signing. Miller admitted to bullying a Black classmate with developmental disabilities when he was 14. Eldon Holmes/Tri-City Storm hide caption

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Eldon Holmes/Tri-City Storm

Every state except Hawaii and Arizona currently observes daylight saving time. But each year, more states say it's time to stop futzing with the clock and embrace daylight saving time year-round. Anna Blazhuk/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Blazhuk/Getty Images

An image shows the first page of the first printing of the final text of the U.S. Constitution. The rare document will go up for auction in December, Sotheby's announced on Tuesday. Courtesy Sotheby's hide caption

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Courtesy Sotheby's

Joseph Kennedy, seen here taking a knee in front of the U.S. Supreme Court last spring, will return to coach at Bremerton High School. His practice of praying on the field sparked a court case over accommodating religious expression in public schools. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Jacob Runyan (left) and Chase Cominsky pleaded not guilty to cheating and other felonies Wednesday, related to a lucrative fishing tournament on Lake Erie where they were accused of stuffing five walleye fish with lead weights and fish filets. Mark Gillispie/AP hide caption

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Mark Gillispie/AP

Late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is being honored with a new Forever stamp from the U.S. Postal Service, showing her wearing a white collar with her black judicial robe. U.S. Postal Service hide caption

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U.S. Postal Service