Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

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Story Archive

Prime Minister Boris Johnson and his staff returns to 10 Downing Street after visiting Buckingham Palace, where he was given permission to form the next government during an audience with Queen Elizabeth II. Stefan Rousseau /WPA Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Stefan Rousseau /WPA Pool/Getty Images

Boris Johnson And Conservative Party Win Large Majority In U.K. Parliament

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Dogs wait for their owners outside a polling station in London, part of a popular tradition of taking pets to the polls. The U.K. is voting in a general election to select 650 members of Parliament. Richard Baker/In Pictures via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Baker/In Pictures via Getty Images

Kentucky state authorities say Kenton County Judge Dawn Gentry coerced colleagues to support her election campaign, made inappropriate advances toward an attorney and had sex in a courthouse office. Kentucky Administrative Office of the Courts hide caption

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Kentucky Administrative Office of the Courts

Swedish climate activist Greta Thunberg was named Time magazine's person of the year for showing "what it might look like when a new generation leads." She's seen here at the COP25 Climate Conference in Madrid on Wednesday. Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images hide caption

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Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images

The FTC said the University of Phoenix's ads sought to mislead prospective students by suggesting the school had close ties to Twitter, MGM and other large companies. University of Phoenix via FTC hide caption

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University of Phoenix via FTC

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis says federal laws that allow foreign nationals to buy guns in the U.S. should be reviewed after a Saudi gunman carried out a mass shooting in Pensacola, Fla. DeSantis says, "The Second Amendment is so that we the American people can keep and bear arms. It does not apply to Saudi Arabians." Brendan Farrington/AP hide caption

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Brendan Farrington/AP

The World Anti-Doping Agency has banned Russia from major events for the next four years, including the 2020 Tokyo Olympics and 2022 Beijing Winter Olympics. Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Nemenov/AFP via Getty Images

Anti-Doping Agency Bans Russia From International Sports Events For 4 Years

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GM and LG Chem say they'll create more than 1,100 jobs in the area around Lordstown, Ohio — where GM closed a manufacturing plant earlier this year. Here, GM's former Lordstown Complex is seen one year ago. Alan Freed/Reuters hide caption

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Alan Freed/Reuters

A protester walks through a cloud of tear gas during a demonstration against national pension changes in Nantes, France, on Thursday. Sebastien Salon-Gomis/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sebastien Salon-Gomis/AFP via Getty Images

National Strike In France Shuts Down Cities Over Macron's Pension Reform Plans

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"This tale defies logic," Trayvon Martin's family said on Wednesday after George Zimmerman filed a lawsuit against the family. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Martin, is seen here delivering a speech in 2017. Paras Griffin/Getty Images hide caption

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Paras Griffin/Getty Images

German authorities say there are signs that the killing of a Georgian man in a Berlin park was a state-sanctioned murder. Zelimkhan Khangoshvili fought against Russian forces in the Second Chechen War. Russia denies any involvement in his killing. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Sean Gallup/Getty Images