Bill Chappell Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, DC.
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Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell

Reporter, Producer

Bill Chappell is a writer, reporter and editor, and a leader on NPR's flagship digital news team. He has frequently contributed to NPR's audio and social media platforms, including hosting dozens of live shows online.

He has gone to two Olympics for NPR (Rio and Pyeongchang), and has been the lead editor for several others. This work focused on finding the human aspect of the Games — and sharing that fascination through text, video and images on NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts.

Because of his contributions, Chappell is also named on NPR's Peabody-award winning team for its Ebola coverage. Years ago, he established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps' presence on NPR.org.

At NPR, Chappell has trained digital and radio staff in how to tell compelling stories online, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks. He was previously NPR.org's homepage editor, and has worked with shows such as Morning Edition, Fresh Air, and All Things Considered.

Prior to NPR, Chappell was an editor on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Story Archive

Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyo.), vice chair of the House Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the U.S. Capitol, says Cassidy Hutchinson showed great patriotism when she testified about inner workings of the White House that day. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

In this aerial view, members of law enforcement investigate a tractor trailer on Monday in San Antonio, Texas. Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images hide caption

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Jordan Vonderhaar/Getty Images

No, the 53 migrants who died in Texas didn't likely cross the border in that truck

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In this courtroom sketch, Ghislaine Maxwell enters the courtroom escorted by U.S. Marshalls at the start of her trial, Nov. 29, 2021, in New York. Elizabeth Williams/AP hide caption

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Elizabeth Williams/AP

Basketball superstar Brittney Griner arrives Monday at a hearing at the Khimki Court, outside Moscow. Griner, a two-time Olympic gold medalist and a WNBA champion, was detained in February on charges of carrying vape cartridges containing cannabis oil. Kirill Kudryavstev/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavstev/AFP via Getty Images

A group photo of the justices at the Supreme Court in Washington on April 23, 2021. Seated from left: Samuel Alito, Clarence Thomas, John Roberts, Stephen Breyer and Sonia Sotomayor. Standing from left: Brett Kavanaugh, Elena Kagan, Neil Gorsuch and Amy Coney Barrett. Erin Schaff /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Erin Schaff /AFP via Getty Images

Thomas Dobbs is the state health officer at the Mississippi State Department of Health. His name appears on the landmark Supreme Court case on abortion rights, despite having "nothing to do with it," he has said. Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

Palestinian artists paint a mural in honor of slain veteran Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh in Gaza City, after she was killed on May 11. A new U.N. report says Israeli forces fired the shots that killed Abu Akleh and injured a colleague. Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammed Abed/AFP via Getty Images

Team USA coach Andrea Fuentes brings Anita Alvarez from the bottom of the pool at the 2022 World Aquatics Championships in Budapest. Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Oli Scarff/AFP via Getty Images

A man prays in front of a sanctuary for the late soccer star Diego Maradona at Argentinos Juniors stadium in Buenos Aires, Argentina, last November. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Rodrigo Abd/AP

The FDA hopes that a new limit on nicotine levels in cigarettes will help people stop smoking or avoid the habit altogether. Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP via Getty Images

In this image taken from video from Bakhtar State News Agency, Taliban fighters secure a government helicopter to evacuate injured people in Gayan district, Paktika province, Afghanistan, Wednesday, June 22, 2022. Bakhtar State News Agency via AP hide caption

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Bakhtar State News Agency via AP

More than 900 people have reportedly been killed in an earthquake in Afghanistan

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The Republican Party of Texas refuses to recognize the legitimacy of President Biden's election win. Just before Biden's inauguration in 2021, armed groups held a rally in front of the Texas State Capitol in Austin. Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Matthew Busch/AFP via Getty Images