Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein
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Rob Stein

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

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Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Elias Williams for NPR

Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

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Doctors In The U.S. Use CRISPR Technique To Treat A Genetic Disorder For The 1st Time

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Gray was diagnosed with sickle cell disease when she was an infant. She was considering a bone marrow transplant when she heard about the CRISPR study and jumped at the chance to volunteer. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

In A 1st, Doctors In U.S. Use CRISPR Tool To Treat Patient With Genetic Disorder

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Using embryonic stem cells, researchers created a structure that mimics the earliest stages of human development in the womb. This image shows the structure breaking the symmetry of the sphere, which starts the development of more complex structures that eventually develop into a fetus. Mijo Simunovic, Ph.D., Simons Junior Fellow, The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Mijo Simunovic, Ph.D., Simons Junior Fellow, The Rockefeller University

Scientists Make Model Embryos From Stem Cells To Study Key Steps In Human Development

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CRISPR technology already allows scientists to make very precise modifications to DNA, and it could revolutionize how doctors prevent and treat many diseases. But using it to create gene-edited babies is still widely considered unethical. Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Gregor Fischer/picture alliance via Getty Images

A Russian Biologist Wants To Create More Gene-Edited Babies

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Some scientists oppose a prohibition on trying to use genetically modified embryos to create babies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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An Anopheles coluzzi mosquito, which can transmit malaria, with a genetically modified fungus emerging from the body after the insect's death. A green fluorescent protein was included to mark the fungus, shown under a UV light. Courtesy of Brian Lovett hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Lovett

Scientists Genetically Modify Fungus To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Malaria

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Zolgensma, a new drug approved by the FDA Friday, costs more than $2.1 million. It's made by AveXis, a drugmaker owned by pharmaceutical giant Novartis. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever

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About two years ago, Alphonso Evans went to the hospital for what he thought was just another bladder infection and ended up in intensive care. In an effort to combat antibiotic-resistant superbugs, scientists have created "living antibiotics" made of viruses that have been genetically modified using the gene-editing tool CRISPR. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs

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