Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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CDC Reverses Controversial Guidelines Regarding Coronavirus Testing

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Trump Administration Blocks FDA From Regulating Many New Medical Tests

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Why Is It So Hard To Get Tested For The Coronavirus Months Into The Pandemic?

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Dr. Anthony Fauci testifies last week in a House subcommittee hearing on the coronavirus. In an online forum Wednesday hosted by Harvard University, he shared that he has received death threats. Erin Scott/Pool via AP hide caption

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Erin Scott/Pool via AP

As Pandemic Widens, How Did We Get To This Point?

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The federal government is giving out funds to develop seven new testing technologies which could increase testing capacity around the U.S. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

People wait in line outside a testing site in Florida. The state has seen unprecedented surges in coronavirus cases in recent weeks. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Pandemic Is Overwhelming U.S. Public Health Capacity In Many States. What Now?

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Biomarin Pharmaceutical, a California company that makes what could become the first gene therapy for hemophilia, says its drug's price tag might be $3 million per patient. Maciej Frolow/Getty Images hide caption

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Maciej Frolow/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For Hemophilia, But Could Be Most Expensive U.S. Drug Ever

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U.S. Wants To Ramp Up COVID-19 Testing To 100 Million A Month By September

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Antigen Test For COVID-19 Isn't As Reliable As Genetic Test, Experts Caution

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As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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Victoria Gray, who underwent a landmark treatment for sickle cell disease last year, has been at home in Forest, Miss., with her three kids, Jadasia Wash (left), Jamarius Wash (second from left) and Jaden Wash. Victoria Gray hide caption

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Victoria Gray

A Year In, 1st Patient To Get Gene Editing For Sickle Cell Disease Is Thriving

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Supplies Sent To Labs By Trump Administration To Boost Testing Are Not Always Helpful

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Public Health Experts Warn The U.S. Lacks Resources To Contain The Coronavirus

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