Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
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A Chicago woman in her 60s is the second U.S. citizen to become infected with the dangerous new coronavirus, health officials said. Tami Chappell/Reuters hide caption

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Tami Chappell/Reuters

2nd U.S. Case Of Wuhan Coronavirus Confirmed

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A light micrograph of a primitive human embryo, composed of four cells, following the initial mitotic divisions that ultimately transform a single-cell organism into one composed of millions of cells. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns

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Chinese Scientist He Jiankui Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison For Editing Human Genes

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Victoria Gray, who has sickle cell disease, volunteered for one of the most anticipated medical experiments in decades: the first attempt to use the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the United States. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Young Mississippi Woman's Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment

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Gene Therapy May Aid In Sickle Cell Disease Treatment

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CRISPR For Sickle Cell Disease Shows Promise In Early Test

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As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

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The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

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Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

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Scientists are exploring a new technique, called prime editing, that is more precise than CRISPR and which uses certain enzymes, including reverse transcriptase, to edit DNA. Evan Oto/Science Source hide caption

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Evan Oto/Science Source

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

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Scientists use a microscope to see if the genetic modification is spreading. Immature modified mosquitoes glow red with yellow eyes when illuminated with a laser. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

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Pierre Kattar for NPR

Although Gray will finally go home to Forest, Miss., she will return to Nashville once a month for four months to undergo blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. But, she says, the hardest part is over. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease

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These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

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Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

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Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

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Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

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Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

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