Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

Nancy Rose, right, who contracted COVID-19 in 2021 and continues to exhibit long-haul symptoms including brain fog and fatigue, cooks for her mother, Amy Russell, left, at their home, Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2022, in Port Jefferson, N.Y. Researchers are trying to understand what causes these long COVID symptoms. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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What's ailing long COVID patients? A new federal study looks for clues

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A new federal study is trying to solve some of the mysterious about long-COVID

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Low-dose COVID vaccine is safe and effective for young kids and babies, Pfizer says

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Pfizer says children under 5 can get 3 low-dose versions of its COVID-19 vaccine

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Another COVID surge strikes but vaccines are protecting people from the worst

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Nurse educator Katie Demelis and nurse manager Nydia White wrap the the body of a patient who died of COVID-19 at Mount Sinai South Nassau hospital in Oceanside, N.Y., on April 15, 2020. Jeffrey Basinger/Newsday via Getty Images hide caption

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First grader Rihanna Chihuaque, 7, receives a COVID-19 vaccine at Arturo Velasquez Institute in Chicago last November. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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FDA authorizes first COVID booster for children ages 5 to 11

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Almost 1 million Americans have died from COVID-19

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Doctors and grief experts on the milestone of 1 million COVID deaths

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Biden marks 1 million deaths from COVID-19 in the United States

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Moderna says its vaccine appears to be about 51 percent effective for children ages 6 months to less than 2 years, and 37 percent effective for those ages 2 to less than 6 years. Ole Spata/dpa picture alliance via Getty Images hide caption

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Ole Spata/dpa picture alliance via Getty Images

Moderna asks FDA to authorize first COVID-19 vaccine for very young children

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FDA considers a Pfizer booster and a Moderna vaccine for children

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The FDA may soon authorize a COVID booster for kids ages 5 to 11

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Finn Washburn, 9, receives an injection of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine in San Jose, Calif., in November. Now the pharmaceutical companies are seeking authorization to give kids a booster dose of the vaccine. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP