Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

Experts Call For More Stringent Mask Requirements As Delta Variant Spreads

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Front-line workers at a medical center in Aurora, Colo., gather for a COVID-19 memorial on July 15 to commemorate the lives lost in the coronavirus pandemic. New estimates say many thousands more will die in the U.S. this summer and fall. Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Hyoung Chang/MediaNews Group/Denver Post via Getty Images

Summer's COVID-19 Surge Is On Track To Get Worse — Maybe Even As Bad As Last Winter

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Heartbreaking 145% Jump In COVID Cases Has Folks Worried Restrictions Will Return

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Where Are The Newest COVID Hot Spots? Mostly Places With Low Vaccination Rates

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The delta variant, first detected in India, is spreading across the globe. In parts of the U.S., the strain accounts for more than 80% of new infections, according to CDC estimates. Boris Roessler/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty hide caption

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Boris Roessler/DPA/Picture Alliance via Getty

Protection Provided By The Pfizer Vaccine May Might Be Fading, Israeli Officials Say

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Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Protects Against Delta Variant Of COVID, Study Finds

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COVID-19 Surge Response Teams Are Being Sent Around The U.S. To Snuff Out Hotspots

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Coronavirus Surges Around The World Are Linked To Delta Variant

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Patrick Doherty Inherited A Devastating Disease. A Breakthrough Stopped It

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Patrick Doherty volunteered for a new medical intervention of gene-editor infusions for the treatment of genetically-based diseases. Patrick Doherty hide caption

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Patrick Doherty

He Inherited A Devastating Disease. A CRISPR Gene-Editing Breakthrough Stopped It

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Delta Variant Is The 'Greatest Threat' In The Battle Against The Pandemic, Says Fauci

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