Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein
Stories By

Rob Stein

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Gene Therapy May Aid In Sickle Cell Disease Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/786612323/786620136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

CRISPR For Sickle Cell Disease Shows Promise In Early Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780949313/780949314" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

As part of a clinical trial to treat sickle cell disease, Victoria Gray (center) has vials of blood drawn by nurses Bonnie Carroll (left) and Kayla Jordan at TriStar Centennial Medical Center in Nashville, Tenn. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Gene-Edited 'Supercells' Make Progress In Fight Against Sickle Cell Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/780510277/780734041" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The preliminary results described Wednesday come from two patients with multiple myeloma and one with sarcoma. This was just a first safety test, the scientists say, and was not designed to measure whether such a treatment would work. Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jure Gasparic/EyeEm/Getty Images

CRISPR Approach To Fighting Cancer Called 'Promising' In 1st Safety Test

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/776169331/776968368" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists are exploring a new technique, called prime editing, that is more precise than CRISPR and which uses certain enzymes, including reverse transcriptase, to edit DNA. Evan Oto/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Oto/Science Source

Scientists Create New, More Powerful Technique To Edit Genes

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/771266879/772050055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists use a microscope to see if the genetic modification is spreading. Immature modified mosquitoes glow red with yellow eyes when illuminated with a laser. Pierre Kattar for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Pierre Kattar for NPR

Although Gray will finally go home to Forest, Miss., she will return to Nashville once a month for four months to undergo blood tests and a bone marrow biopsy. But, she says, the hardest part is over. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Patient Hopes Gene-Editing Can Help With Pain Of Sickle Cell Disease

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/766765780/768835526" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

These human embryo-like structures (top) were synthesized from human stem cells; they've been stained to illustrate different cell types. Images (bottom) of the "embryoids" in the new device that was invented to make them. Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor hide caption

toggle caption
Yi Zheng/University of Michigan, Ann Arbor

Scientists Create A Device That Can Mass-Produce Human Embryoids

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/757072996/759899470" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists In New York Are Trying To Edit The DNA In Human Sperm

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/753493975/753493976" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gianpiero Palermo, a professor of embryology at Weill Cornell Medicine, runs the lab where scientists are trying to use CRISPR to edit genes in human sperm. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

Scientists Attempt Controversial Experiment To Edit DNA In Human Sperm Using CRISPR

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/746321083/753359129" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doctors In The U.S. Use CRISPR Technique To Treat A Genetic Disorder For The 1st Time

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/746365947/746365948" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript