Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

A registered nurse stirs a nasal swab in testing solution after administering a COVID-19 test in Los Angeles, Calif. Increased testing could help in efforts to detect and track new variants like omicron. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Experts say more testing is urgently needed to spot and track the variant in the U.S.

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The FDA is likely to sign off on Pfizer's COVID booster for all vaccinated adults

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New clues to the biology of long COVID are starting to emerge

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Hattie Pierce, 75, receives a Pfizer covid-19 vaccine booster shot from Dr. Tiffany Taliaferro at the Safeway on Capitol Hill in Washington, D.C., on Monday, October 4, 2021. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Imag

More people are getting boosters than are getting a 1st COVID vaccine shot

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The CDC endorses the rollouts of vaccine boosters from Moderna and J&J

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FDA officials authorize Moderna and J&J COVID vaccine boosters

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If You're Vaccinated, You Can Visit The US From Abroad In November

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The availability of COVID-19 boosters may soon expand dramatically

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People who got the Moderna vaccine may soon be eligible for COVID boosters

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NIH study of COVID-19 vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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A study by the National Institutes of Health this week suggests people who got the J&J vaccine as their initial vaccination against the coronavirus may get their best protection from choosing an mRNA vaccine as the booster. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times/Getty Images hide caption

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A study of COVID vaccine boosters suggests Moderna or Pfizer works best

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The FDA may authorize more booster shots and is assessing a pill to treat COVID-19

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