Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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Antigen Test For COVID-19 Isn't As Reliable As Genetic Test, Experts Caution

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As Coronavirus Surges, How Much Testing Does Your State Need To Subdue The Virus?

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Victoria Gray, who underwent a landmark treatment for sickle cell disease last year, has been at home in Forest, Miss., with her three kids, Jadasia Wash (left), Jamarius Wash (second from left) and Jaden Wash. Victoria Gray hide caption

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Victoria Gray

A Year In, 1st Patient To Get Gene Editing For Sickle Cell Disease Is Thriving

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Supplies Sent To Labs By Trump Administration To Boost Testing Are Not Always Helpful

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Public Health Experts Warn The U.S. Lacks Resources To Contain The Coronavirus

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Visitors to the River Walk pass a restaurant that reopened in San Antonio last last month. Like other states, Texas continues to reopen despite the persistence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Eric Gay/AP hide caption

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U.S. Hits 2 Million Coronavirus Cases As Many States See A Surge Of Patients

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As Cities Hit Hardest By COVID-19 Reopen, Red Flags Emerge In Other Areas

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Experts Fear Mass Protests May Cause New Coronavirus Outbreaks Around The U.S.

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Dr. Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, says a new analysis supports the effectiveness of the CDC's system for spotting infectious disease outbreaks early. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Antibody Testing Is Increasing, But A Positive Result Doesn't Prove Immunity

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Kansas National Guard member Roy Manns writes down results as he runs samples through an Abbott coronavirus testing machine at a drive-through testing site on Wednesday in Dodge City. Charlie Riedel/AP hide caption

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Blood collection tubes sit in a rack on the first day of a free COVID-19 antibody testing event at the Volusia County Fairgrounds in DeLand, Fla., on May 4. Paul Hennessy/Echoes WIre/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Getting An Antibody Test For The Coronavirus? Here's What It Won't Tell You

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FDA Worries COVID-19 Test Misses Too Many People Who Are Infected

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