Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Flu patient Donnie Cardenas waits in an emergency room hallway with roommate Torrey Jewett at the Palomar Medical Center in Escondido, Calif., this past week. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Bull/AP

Flu Season Is Shaping Up To Be A Nasty One, CDC Says

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577632089/577713388" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Gene Editing Experiments In Mice May Help People Hear Too

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/573142662/573142663" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Life expectancy in the U.S. has fallen for the second straight year, in part because of the surge of overdoses on opioids, such as oxycodone. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
John Moore/Getty Images

Life Expectancy Drops Again As Opioid Deaths Surge In U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/572080314/572535026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists Use Gene Editing To Prevent A Form Of Deafness In Mice

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/571208704/572376207" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This Food and Drug Administration approved Luxturna, a gene therapy developed by Spark Therapeutics, to treat an inherited form of blindness. Courtesy of Spark Therapeutics via AP hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of Spark Therapeutics via AP

The Food and Drug Administration plans to take action against risky homeopathic remedies under a policy unveiled Monday. Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Baumann/EyeEm/Getty Images

Food And Drug Administration Plans Crackdown On Risky Homeopathic Remedies

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/571666553/571735730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Could Probiotics Protect Kids From A Downside Of Antibiotics?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/567746569/578817059" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Australia had a particularly hard flu season this year, which may predict similar challenges for the U.S. Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Pascal Pochard-Casabianca/AFP/Getty Images

In The U.S., Flu Season Could Be Unusually Harsh This Year

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/569379155/569983815" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Pasieka/Science Photo Library/Getty Images

Gene Therapy Shows Promise For A Growing List Of Diseases

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/565728869/567155749" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kolbi Brown (left), a program manager at Harlem Hospital in New York, helps Karen Phillips sign up to receive more information about the All of Us medical research program, during a block party outside the Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem. Elias Williams for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Elias Williams for NPR

Troubling History In Medical Research Still Fresh For Black Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/556673640/560089163" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists have used a new gene-editing technique to create pigs that can keep their bodies warmer, burning more fat to produce leaner meat. Infrared pictures of 6-month-old pigs taken at zero, two, and four hours after cold exposure show that the pigs' thermoregulation was improved after insertion of the new gene. The modified pigs are on the right side of the images. Zheng et al. / PNAS hide caption

toggle caption
Zheng et al. / PNAS

CRISPR Bacon: Chinese Scientists Create Genetically Modified Low-Fat Pigs

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/559060166/559889678" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A panel of experts has recommended that the Food and Drug Administration approve a treatment developed by Spark Therapeutics for a rare form of blindness. Spark Therapeutics hide caption

toggle caption
Spark Therapeutics

FDA Panel Endorses Gene Therapy For A Form Of Childhood Blindness

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/557183740/557444730" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

3 Americans Win Nobel In Medicine For Circadian Rhythm Research

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/555170222/555170223" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript