Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

FDA advisers recommend new COVID vaccines designed specifically to fend off omicron

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The FDA considers the nation's next round of vaccines to battle COVID-19

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CDC OKs vaccinations for children 6 months to 5 years old

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The omicron variant, though much more contagious than the delta strain, is still prevalent in the U.S. but is less likely than delta to cause long COVID, according to a new study. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Omicron poses about half the risk of long COVID as delta, new research finds

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The FDA is reviewing COVID vaccines for children 5 and younger

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Moderna says its vaccine is safe for babies, and travelers won't need COVID tests

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Moderna says its new COVID vaccine is effective against omicron

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A new version of Moderna's COVID vaccine provides strong protection against Omicron

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Moderna says its new bivalent vaccine is its "lead candidate for a Fall 2022 booster." Here, a vial of the company's COVID-19 vaccine sits on a table at a vaccination clinic in San Rafael, California. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Moderna says its new vaccine booster shows 'superior' response to omicron

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FDA advisors recommend the Novavax COVID vaccine

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Dr. Stephaun Wallace, who leads the global external relations strategies for the COVID-19 Prevention Network at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, receives his second injection from Dr. Tia Babu during the Novavax vaccine phase 3 clinical trial in February 2021. Karen Ducey/Getty Images hide caption

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Advisers to the FDA back Novavax COVID vaccine

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A new COVID-19 vaccine may be on the way

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A new, more traditional COVID shot may appeal to those hesitant to get mRNA vaccines

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Syringes filled with the Novavax COVID-19 vaccine were prepared for use at a vaccination center in Berlin, Germany, in February. Soon the vaccine could become available in the U.S. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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The White House says COVID vaccination for kids younger than 5 could start soon

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