Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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Story Archive

NIH Lab Races To Create Coronavirus Vaccine In Record Time

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A masked Yoda and Pikachu guard a table with signs notifying evacuees of times for daily temperature checks. Chunlin Leonhard hide caption

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Chunlin Leonhard

Halfway Through U.S. Quarantines, Two Women Describe 'Surreal,' Lonely Waits

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Chunlin Leonhard, is under quarantine at the Travis Air Force Base. She and others under quarantine are housed on base and where they receive delivered meals three times a day. Chunlin Leonhard hide caption

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Chunlin Leonhard

What It's Like To Be Evacuated From China — And Quarantined Over Coronavirus Fears

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195 U.S. citizens who were evacuated from Wuhan, China, were placed in quarantine at March Air Reserve Base in Riverside County, Calif. New quarantine orders and travel restrictions intended to prevent the spread of coronavirus were announced Friday. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP

U.S. Coronavirus Quarantine And Travel Limits: Needed Protection Or Overreaction?

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U.S. Quarantines Americans Evacuated From Wuhan, Declares Public Health Emergency

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A Chicago woman in her 60s is the second U.S. citizen to become infected with the dangerous new coronavirus, health officials said. Tami Chappell/Reuters hide caption

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Tami Chappell/Reuters

2nd U.S. Case Of Wuhan Coronavirus Confirmed

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A light micrograph of a primitive human embryo, composed of four cells, following the initial mitotic divisions that ultimately transform a single-cell organism into one composed of millions of cells. Science Photo Libra/Getty Images hide caption

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Science Photo Libra/Getty Images

Embryo Research To Reduce Need For In Vitro Fertilization Raises Ethical Concerns

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Chinese Scientist He Jiankui Sentenced To 3 Years In Prison For Editing Human Genes

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Victoria Gray, who has sickle cell disease, volunteered for one of the most anticipated medical experiments in decades: the first attempt to use the gene-editing technique CRISPR to treat a genetic disorder in the United States. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

A Young Mississippi Woman's Journey Through A Pioneering Gene-Editing Experiment

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Gene Therapy May Aid In Sickle Cell Disease Treatment

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CRISPR For Sickle Cell Disease Shows Promise In Early Test

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