Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

The coronavirus variant first spotted in South Africa alarms scientists because it evolved a mutation, known as E484K, that appears to make it better at evading antibodies produced by the immune system. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Gaertner/Science Source

CDC Says Coronavirus Variants Could Reverse Recent Progress In Declining Numbers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971912599/971912600" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Scientists And Vaccine Manufacturers Scramble To Address Coronavirus Variants

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971525825/971525826" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

COVID-19 Variant Found In New York City Worries Researchers

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971261746/971261747" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Friedrich Karl Berger, in a 1959 photo. A court found that he helped guard prisoners when they were forced to evacuate a Nazi concentration camp in a nearly two-week trip under "inhumane conditions," the Justice Department said. Department of Justice hide caption

toggle caption
Department of Justice

California Governor Gavin Newsom speaks at a press conference following the opening of a new large scale COVID-19 vaccination site in Los Angeles on Tuesday. Newsom says the state will start setting aside 10% of its vaccine allotment for teachers, day care workers and other school employees. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

New Coronavirus Variants Appear To Have Evolved In The U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/968252558/968252559" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Is The Biden Administration Doing Enough To Boost COVID-19 Testing?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/965901880/966199670" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

COVID Cases Finally Are Falling. Experts Worry Variants Could Erase That Fast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/964764243/964764244" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Just As Vaccine Distribution Begins, New COVID-19 Variants Arrive In U.S.

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/962357968/962357969" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

How Biden's Administration Is Prioritizing The COVID-19 Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/959884075/959884076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A patient lies on a stretcher in the hallway of the overloaded emergency room at Providence St. Mary Medical Center amid a surge in COVID-19 patients in Southern California in late December. Average new daily infections are now going down in California and much of the country. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mario Tama/Getty Images

Current, Deadly U.S. Coronavirus Surge Has Peaked, Researchers Say

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/958870301/959107311" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Mask-wearing and social distancing are up in the United States, a survey finds. Noam Galai/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Noam Galai/Getty Images

Mask-Wearing, Social Distancing Improve, But Too Slowly, Survey Shows

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/956760985/957141183" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript