Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein
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Rob Stein

Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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Some scientists oppose a prohibition on trying to use genetically modified embryos to create babies. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

House Committee Votes To Continue Ban On Genetically Modified Babies

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The genetic variation Chinese scientist He Jiankui was trying to re-create when he edited twin girls' DNA may be more harmful than helpful to health overall, a new study says. Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images hide caption

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Anthony Kwan/Bloomberg/Getty Images

2 Chinese Babies With Edited Genes May Face Higher Risk Of Premature Death

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An Anopheles coluzzi mosquito, which can transmit malaria, with a genetically modified fungus emerging from the body after the insect's death. A green fluorescent protein was included to mark the fungus, shown under a UV light. Courtesy of Brian Lovett hide caption

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Courtesy of Brian Lovett

Scientists Genetically Modify Fungus To Kill Mosquitoes That Spread Malaria

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Zolgensma, a new drug approved by the FDA Friday, costs more than $2.1 million. It's made by AveXis, a drugmaker owned by pharmaceutical giant Novartis. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

At $2.1 Million, New Gene Therapy Is The Most Expensive Drug Ever

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About two years ago, Alphonso Evans went to the hospital for what he thought was just another bladder infection and ended up in intensive care. In an effort to combat antibiotic-resistant superbugs, scientists have created "living antibiotics" made of viruses that have been genetically modified using the gene-editing tool CRISPR. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Rob Stein/NPR

Scientists Modify Viruses With CRISPR To Create New Weapon Against Superbugs

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Isabelle Carnell-Holdaway (left), now 17, with her mother Joanne Carnell-Holdaway. Isabelle has a dangerous infection that is being treated with a cocktail of genetically modified viruses. Courtesy of Jo Holdaway hide caption

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Courtesy of Jo Holdaway

Genetically Modified Viruses Help Save A Patient With A 'Superbug' Infection

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CRISPR gene-editing technology allows scientists to make highly precise modifications to DNA. The technology is now starting to be used in human trials to treat several diseases in the U.S. Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library hide caption

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Molekuul/Getty Images/Science Photo Library

First U.S. Patients Treated With CRISPR As Human Gene-Editing Trials Get Underway

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Scientists Plan To Start Human Trials Testing CRISPR Soon

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There was an uproar in 2018 when a scientist in China, He Jiankui, announced that he had successfully used CRISPR to edit the genes of twin girls when they were embryos. Prominent scientists hope to stop further attempts at germline editing, at least for now. Mark Schiefelbein/AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein/AP

Scientists Call For Global Moratorium On Creating Gene-Edited Babies

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Jonah Reeder prepares a special protein shake that helps him manage a metabolic condition called phenylketonuria. Julia Ritchey/KUER hide caption

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Julia Ritchey/KUER

A Gulp Of Genetically Modified Bacteria Might Someday Treat A Range Of Illnesses

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