Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Maggie Starbard/NPR
Rob Stein
Maggie Starbard/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 25 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the Association of Health Care Journalists.

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Story Archive

Immature human eggs (pink) were created by Japanese researchers using stem cells that were derived from blood cells. Courtesy of Saitou Lab hide caption

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Courtesy of Saitou Lab

Scientists Create Immature Human Eggs From Stem Cells

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Who Should Take Aspirin Every Day?

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Daily low-dose aspirin can be of help to older people with an elevated risk for a heart attack. But for healthy older people, the risk outweighs the benefit. Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruno Ehrs/Getty Images

Study: A Daily Baby Aspirin Has No Benefit For Healthy Older People

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Aaron Reid, 20, rests in an exam room in the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Md. Rebecca Davis/NPR hide caption

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Update: A Young Man's Experiment With A 'Living Drug' For Leukemia

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An unidentified 15-year-old student at a high school in Cambridge, Mass., vaped near campus in April. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

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Steven Senne/AP

FDA Intensifies Crackdown On E-Cigarette Sales To Teenagers

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Patient Aaron Reid receives (CAR) T-cell therapy at the NIH in Bethesda, MD. The process took five minutes to complete. Pearl Mak/NPR hide caption

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Scientists Race To Improve 'Living Drugs' To Fight Cancer

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Mother Daniele Santos holds her baby Juan Pedro, who has microcephaly, on May 30, 2016, in Recife, Brazil. Researchers are now learning that Zika's effects can appear up to a year after birth. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

Babies Who Seem Fine At Birth May Have Zika-Related Problems Later, Study Finds

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A new study finds certain drugs that can boost the immune system show promise for developing anti-aging treatments in the future. David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm hide caption

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David Pereiras / EyeEm/Getty Images/EyeEm

Experimental Drugs Boost Elderly Immune Systems, Raising Hopes For Anti-Aging Effects

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Poliovirus, long a scourge, has been modified by Duke University researchers for experimental use as a brain cancer treatment. Juan Gaertner/Science Source hide caption

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Juan Gaertner/Science Source

Rita Steyn has a family history of cancer so she ordered a home genetic testing kit to see if she carried certain genetic mutations that increase the risk for the disease. Courtesy of Rita Steyn hide caption

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Courtesy of Rita Steyn

Results Of At-Home Genetic Tests For Health Can Be Hard To Interpret

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If you're at low risk for heart disease, an electrocardiogram shouldn't be a routine test for you, a panel of medical experts says. Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source hide caption

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Bruno Boissonnet/Science Source
Marina Muun for NPR

Her Son Is One Of The Few Children To Have 3 Parents' DNA

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News Brief: Primary Results, Facebook In China, '3-Parent Babies'

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A scientist from the Nadiya Clinic in Kiev, Ukraine inserts a needle into a fertilized egg to extract the DNA of a man and woman trying to have a baby. The clinic is combining the DNA from three different people to create babies for women who are infertile. Rob Stein/NPR hide caption

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Clinic Claims Success In Making Babies With 3 Parents' DNA

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