Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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CDC Expands Definition Of Being At Increased Risk Of Having Caught The Coronavirus

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Coronavirus Test Results Are Still Taking Too Long, A Survey Shows

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Trump Plans To Resume Public Activities With South Lawn Appearance

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A Marine is posted Thursday outside the West Wing of the White House, signifying the president is in the Oval Office. President Trump's physician said that he could return to public engagements as soon as Saturday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Regular coronavirus testing can be a valuable tool in preventing the spread of infection but only if accompanied with other critical health measures, experts say. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

A Nobel Prize gold medal seen during the manufacturing process in the Swedish Mint. The medals, presented to each laureate, are made of 18 karat recycled gold and weigh 175 grams (6.13 ounces). The economics medal weighs 185 grams (6.48 ounces). Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint) hide caption

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Markus Marcetic/Courtesy of Myntverket (Swedish Mint)

President Trump shakes hands with now-former White House physician Dr. Ronny Jackson in January 2018 following his first medical checkup as president. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

What A Positive Coronavirus Test Means For President Trump's Health

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A new wave of rapid coronavirus tests has entered the market with the potential to greatly expand screening for the virus. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Can The U.S. Use Its Growing Supply Of Rapid Tests To Stop The Virus?

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CDC Reverses Controversial Guidelines Regarding Coronavirus Testing

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Trump Administration Blocks FDA From Regulating Many New Medical Tests

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Why Is It So Hard To Get Tested For The Coronavirus Months Into The Pandemic?

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Dr. Anthony Fauci testifies last week in a House subcommittee hearing on the coronavirus. In an online forum Wednesday hosted by Harvard University, he shared that he has received death threats. Erin Scott/Pool via AP hide caption

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Erin Scott/Pool via AP