Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

Friday

Immunity Americans acquired through vaccination or via prior infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus may account for the lighter than expected COVID surge in the U.S. this winter, researchers say. David Ryder/Getty Images hide caption

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David Ryder/Getty Images

This winter's U.S. COVID surge is fading fast, likely thanks to a 'wall' of immunity

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Friday

FDA proposes easing restrictions on blood donations, seeks public comment

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Thursday

A controversial proposal would update COVID vaccines each year for dominant strain

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Monday

Licensed vocational nurse Denise Saldana vaccinates Pri DeSilva, associate director of Individual and Corporate Giving, with a fourth Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine booster at the Dr. Kenneth Williams Health Center in Los Angeles, Nov. 1, 2022. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

The FDA considers a major shift in the nation's COVID vaccine strategy

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Wednesday

With COVID, flu and cold viruses spreading widely this winter, researchers looked into whether you can get infected with more than one at once. Nathan Howard/AP hide caption

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Nathan Howard/AP

Can you get COVID and the flu at the same time?

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Saturday

In hopes of getting a better sense of which SARS-CoV-2 variants might be coming into the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently expanded its voluntary testing of some passengers exiting from international flights at certain airports. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP

Friday

Screening at U.S. airports expands to try to detect new COVID variants

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Sunday

The RSV surge has peaked, and the flu is receding — but COVID rates are up again

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Friday

U.S. infectious disease experts fear that a winter surge of respiratory illness — like the one that overloaded emergency rooms with COVID-19 patients in January 2021 — could yet materialize this winter, with several circulating viruses wreaking havoc. So far, though, it looks like early peaks of RSV and the flu are receding. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

RSV recedes and flu peaks as a new COVID variant shoots 'up like a rocket'

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Thursday

Travelers from China must now test negative for COVID to enter the U.S.

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Wednesday

Government agency examined how often long-COVID was cited as a cause of death

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Tuesday

Katie Pope Kopp, 64, of Parkville, Mo., at Union Station in Kansas City this week. Kopp underwent a new form of experimental CAR T-cell therapy that used the CRISPR gene-editing technique to treat her non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The cancer has been in remission for over a year. Barrett Emke for NPR hide caption

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Barrett Emke for NPR

CRISPR gene-editing may boost cancer immunotherapy, new study finds

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Tuesday

What to know about the fears of a 'tripledemic' this holiday season

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Monday