Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Stories By

Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

Researchers say all three authorized COVID vaccines are good at keeping people out of the hospital, but Moderna seems to have the longest-lasting protection. Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

COVID-19 Stats: Deaths Are Up, Delta Variant May Be Starting To Wane

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1037782106/1037782107" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kathleen Hipps was fully vaccinated when she got sick from COVID-19—a breakthrough infection. Weeks later, she's still experiencing symptoms. Kathleen Hipps hide caption

toggle caption
Kathleen Hipps

Weeks after getting sick from COVID-19, Kathleen Hipps is still experiencing symptoms, even though she was fully vaccinated. Kathleen Hipps hide caption

toggle caption
Kathleen Hipps

What We Know About Breakthrough Infections And Long COVID

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1032844687/1036533255" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The White House Is Expected To Announce A 6-Prong Plan To Address The Pandemic

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1035436798/1035439770" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

More People Are Relying On COVID-19 Tests, But Experts Say They're Not Foolproof

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1034281124/1034281125" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Johnson & Johnson Says A Booster Shot For Its Vaccine May Have Big Benefits

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030914348/1030918813" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A nurse fills a syringe with Johnson & Johnson's COVID-19 vaccine at a clinic in Pasadena, Calif., on Thursday. Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images

The FDA Has Approved Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030430457/1030430458" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

FDA Gives Full Approval To Pfizer's COVID-19 Vaccine

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030271280/1030283509" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Delta Variant Forces The Trajectory Of The Pandemic Up Sharply

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1023637157/1023637158" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Family members gather outside the window of a COVID-19 patient at Lake Regional Hospital in Osage Beach, Mo., on Monday. Sarah Blake Morgan/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Blake Morgan/AP

A CDC Document Gives New Details On Just How Dangerous The Delta Variant Really Is

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1022580439/1022693120" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A man receives the Pfizer COVID vaccine in Ramat Gan, Israel. A small Israeli study suggests vaccinated people who experience rare breakthrough infections may develop symptoms that last as long as six weeks. Amir Levy/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Amir Levy/Getty Images

COVID Symptoms May Linger In Some Vaccinated People Who Get Infected, Study Finds

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1021888033/1021892898" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A female Anopheles mosquito, a common vector for malaria, feeds on human skin. In a landmark study, researchers showed that genetically modified Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes could crash their own species in an environment mimicking sub-Saharan Africa, where the malaria-carrying mosquitoes spread. Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons hide caption

toggle caption
Dunpharlain/Wikimedia Commons

How An Altered Strand Of DNA Can Cause Malaria-Spreading Mosquitoes To Self-Destruct

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1020932493/1021600485" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Experts Call For More Stringent Mask Requirements As Delta Variant Spreads

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1020088162/1020088163" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript