Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

Story Archive

Gustavo Perez got his influenza vaccine from pharmacist Patricia Pernal in early September during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the city's Southwest Senior Center. This year's flu season may strike earlier and harder than usual, experts warn. A flu shot's your best protection. Scott Olson/ Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/ Getty Images

Pfzier and Moderna seek authorization of omicron booster for kids ages 5-11

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Health officials are predicting this winter could see an active flu season on top of potential COVID surges. In short, it's a good year to be a respiratory virus. Left: Image of SARS-CoV-2 omicron virus particles (pink) replicating within an infected cell (teal). Right: Image of an inactive H3N2 influenza virus. NIAID/Science Source hide caption

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NIAID/Science Source

Flu is expected to flare up in U.S. this winter, raising fears of a 'twindemic'

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President Joe Biden removes his face mask as he walks on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, DC, on August 24, 2022. OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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OLIVIER DOULIERY/AFP via Getty Images

A pharmacist prepares to administer COVID-19 vaccine booster shots during an event hosted by the Chicago Department of Public Health at the Southwest Senior Center on September 09, 2022 in Chicago, Illinois. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

How Biden's declaring the pandemic 'over' complicates efforts to fight COVID

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Biden's remarks that the pandemic is over hurts efforts to save lives, experts say

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Making sense of COVID-19's risk now

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A pharmacy in New York City offers vaccines for COVID-19 and flu. Some researchers argue that the two diseases may pose similar risks of dying for those infected. Ted Shaffrey/AP hide caption

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Ted Shaffrey/AP

Scientists debate how lethal COVID is. Some say it's now less risky than flu

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The new COVID boosters rolling out this month represent a shift in strategy, said White House COVID-19 Response Coordinator Dr. Ashish Jha during a press briefing. The goal now will likely be to roll out new boosters annually. Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images hide caption

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Anna Moneymaker/Getty Images

The new COVID booster could be the last you'll need for a year, federal officials say

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New COVID-19 boosters to be available for those 12 and up

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Vials of the reformulated Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 booster move through production at a plant in Kalamazoo, Mich. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

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Pfizer Inc.

CDC recommends new booster shots to fight omicron

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Vials of the newly reformulated COVID-19 vaccine booster are being readied by Pfizer for distribution now that the Food and Drug Administration has authorized the shots for people 12 and older. Pfizer Inc. hide caption

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Pfizer Inc.