Rob Stein Rob Stein is a Correspondent and Senior Editor on NPR's Science Desk.
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
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Rob Stein

Mike Morgan/NPR
Rob Stein, photographed for NPR, 22 January 2020, in Washington DC.
Mike Morgan/NPR

Rob Stein

Correspondent and Senior Editor, Science Desk

Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

An award-winning science journalist with more than 30 years of experience, Stein mostly covers health and medicine. He tends to focus on stories that illustrate the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, women's health issues, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein worked at The Washington Post for 16 years, first as the newspaper's science editor and then as a national health reporter. Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years as an editor at NPR's science desk. Before that, he was a science reporter for United Press International (UPI) in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Stein's work has been honored by many organizations, including the National Academy of Sciences, the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Association for Cancer Research, and the Association of Health Care Journalists. He was twice part of NPR teams that won Peabody Awards.

Stein frequently represents NPR, speaking at universities, international meetings and other venues, including the University of Cambridge in Britain, the World Conference of Science Journalists in South Korea, and the Aspen Institute in Washington, DC.

Stein is a graduate of the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He completed a journalism fellowship at the Harvard School of Public Health, a program in science and religion at the University of Cambridge, and a summer science writer's workshop at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Mass.

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Delta Variant Is The 'Greatest Threat' In The Battle Against The Pandemic, Says Fauci

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Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, warned on Tuesday of the danger from the Delta variant of the coronavirus. Among those not yet vaccinated, Delta may trigger serious illness in more people than other variants do. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Fauci Warns Dangerous Delta Variant Is The Greatest Threat To U.S. COVID Efforts

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CDC Has Declared Coronavirus Delta Variant A 'Variant Of Concern'

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The infectious and contagious rabies virus, shown here in a colorized micrograph, can be transmitted to humans through the bite or saliva of an infected animal. Thanks to protective vaccination of pets, rabies was eliminated from the U.S. dog population in 2007, though a bite from infected bats, skunks and raccoons can still transmit the virus. Biophoto Associates/Science Source hide caption

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Biophoto Associates/Science Source

The U.S. Bans Importing Dogs From 113 Countries After Rise In False Rabies Records

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States Scale Back Pandemic Reporting, Stirring Alarm

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Pandemic Restrictions Have Eased As Memorial Day Approaches. But It's Not Over Yet

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In Cases Of Vaccine Failure, CDC To Focus On Those Who Get Hospitalized Or Die

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The vaccines for COVID-19 are highly effective, but people can get infected in what appear to be extremely rare cases. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has decided only to investigate the cases that result in hospitalization or death. Image Point FR/NIH/NIAID/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images hide caption

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Image Point FR/NIH/NIAID/BSIP/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

CDC Move To Limit Investigations Into COVID Breakthrough Infections Sparks Concerns

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New guidance would ease restrictions on researching embryos in the lab. BSIP/Science Source hide caption

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BSIP/Science Source

Controversial New Guidelines Would Allow Experiments On More Mature Human Embryos

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This microscope image from the National Cancer Institute Center for Cancer Research shows human colon cancer cells with the nuclei stained red. Americans should start getting screened for colon cancer at age 45, according to new guidelines from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. AP hide caption

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AP

Coronavirus Variant From India Appears To Be Spreading In The U.S.

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Carlene Knight, 54, is one of the first patients in a landmark study designed to try to restore vision in those who have a rare genetic disease that causes blindness. Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University hide caption

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Josh Andersen/Oregon Health & Science University

Blind Patients Hope Landmark Gene-Editing Experiment Will Restore Their Vision

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Around a third of the U.S. population has been fully vaccinated against COVID-19 after several months of a concerted push to immunize the country. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Vaccinations May Be Reaching A Tipping Point In Fight Against Virus, Experts Say

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U.S. May Have Hit The Mark With Vaccinations To Beat Back COVID-19

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U.S. Reaches Another Crucial Juncture In The Fight Against COVID-19

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