Leila Fadel Leila Fadel is a national correspondent for NPR based in Las Vegas, covering issues of culture, diversity, and race.
Leila Fadel at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Leila Fadel

Allison Shelley/NPR
Leila Fadel at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Leila Fadel

National Correspondent

Leila Fadel is a national correspondent for NPR based in Las Vegas, covering issues of culture, diversity, and race.

Most recently, she was NPR's international correspondent based in Cairo and covered the wave of revolts in the Middle East and their aftermaths in Libya, Tunisia, Egypt, and beyond. Her stories brought us to the heart of a state-ordered massacre of pro-Muslim Brotherhood protesters in Cairo in 2013 when police shot into crowds of people to clear them and killed between 1,000 and 2,000 people. She told us the tales of a coup in Egypt and what it is like for a country to go through a military overthrow of an elected government. She covered the fall of Mosul to ISIS in 2014 and documented the harrowing tales of the Yazidi women who were kidnapped and enslaved by the group. Her coverage also included stories of human smugglers in Egypt and the Syrian families desperate and willing to pay to risk their lives and cross a turbulent ocean for Europe.

She was awarded the Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club for her coverage of the 2013 coup in Egypt and the toll it took on the country and Egyptian families. In 2017 she earned a Gracie award for the story of a single mother in Tunisia whose two eldest daughters were brainwashed and joined ISIS. The mother was fighting to make sure it didn't happen to her younger girls.

Before joining NPR, she covered the Middle East for The Washington Post as the Cairo Bureau Chief. Prior to her position as Cairo Bureau Chief for the Post, she covered the Iraq war for nearly five years with Knight Ridder, McClatchy Newspapers, and later the Washington Post. Her foreign coverage of the devastating human toll of the Iraq war earned her the George. R. Polk award in 2007. In 2016 she was the Council on Foreign Relations Edward R. Murrow fellow.

Leila Fadel is a Lebanese-American journalist who speaks conversational Arabic and was raised in Saudi Arabia and Lebanon.

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Story Archive

Singer Anita Bryant (right) is led to the voting booth at her Miami Beach polling place by volunteer Leah Dezen in 1977. Bryant was the leader of the opposition group Save Our Children, whose members pushed for the repeal of a gay-rights ordinance in Miami-Dade County. Kathy A. Willens/AP hide caption

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Kathy A. Willens/AP

The Culture Wars Live On Between The LGBTQ Rights Movement And The Religious Right

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Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) is one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress. She has been the target of criticism and censure for statements regarded as anti-Semitic. Many other prominent black Muslim leaders say her experience is familiar. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

American Muslims In Public Life Say They Face Outsize Scrutiny

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A Trump supporter holds up a sign during an anti-Sharia law rally organized by ACT for America. A new report finds that mainstream philanthropies are unknowingly funneling donations to anti-Muslim groups such as ACT for America. Kena Betancur /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur /AFP/Getty Images

Greg McDonald Jr. (left) sits with his fiancé Jon Jost. McDonald's parents considered sending him to counseling when they were concerned he was gay. Now they support a ban on conversion therapy. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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Leila Fadel/NPR

Activists And Suicide Prevention Groups Seek Bans On Conversion Therapy For Minors

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A new study finds that up to 20 percent of the LGBT population in this country live in rural America. For the most part, they chose that life for the same reasons others do: tight-knit communities with a shared sense of values. Roy Hsu/Getty Images/Uppercut RF hide caption

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Roy Hsu/Getty Images/Uppercut RF

At the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia on Friday, Nayab Khan, 22, cries at a vigil to mourn for the victims of the Christchurch mosque attacks in New Zealand. Mark Makela/Reuters hide caption

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Mark Makela/Reuters

Coping With The Persistent Trauma Of Anti-Muslim Rhetoric And Violence

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An interfaith vigil, offering prayers and support for the Muslim community, begins at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Mich., on Saturday evening. Razi Jafri/Michigan Public Radio hide caption

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Razi Jafri/Michigan Public Radio

'We Are Not Safe Unless We Are Together' — Interfaith Vigils Follow Mosque Shootings

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Interfaith Outreach After The New Zealand Attack

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U.S. Muslims Search For Solace After New Zealand Attack

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Annelise Capossela for NPR

In These Divided Times, Is Civility Under Siege?

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Examining Civility In A Time Of Deepening Political Divisions

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Melanie Keener stands outside the Storey County Courthouse in Virginia City, Nev., where she now works in a largely undefined security job. After filing a sexual harassment complaint against Sheriff Gerald Antinoro, Keener was removed from her position as the sheriff's chief deputy. Maggie Starbard for NPR hide caption

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Maggie Starbard for NPR

'Coming Forward Has Broke Me': #MeToo Movement Comes To Rural Nevada

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Nevada Sheriff Continues Getting Elected Despite Allegations Of Sexual Assault

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The National Socialist Movement, a neo-Nazi group that has been designated a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, held a rally in Newnan, Ga., in April 2018. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

U.S. Hate Groups Rose 30 Percent In Recent Years, Watchdog Group Reports

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