Leila Fadel Leila Fadel is a national correspondent for NPR based in Las Vegas, covering issues of culture, diversity, and race.
Leila Fadel at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., September 27, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
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Leila Fadel

Egyptian men and boys pray at a mosque in Assiut, southern Egypt, that serves as the headquarters for Gamaa al-Islamiya, a group that once waged a bloody insurgency, attacking police and Christians in a campaign to create an Islamic state. Now the Islamist group says it's determined to ensure law and order in the area. Nariman El-Mofty/AP hide caption

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Nariman El-Mofty/AP

Islamists Say They Are Filling Vacuum Left By Egyptian State

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Police Officers Caught In The Middle Go On Strike In Egypt

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An Egyptian military police officer argues with protesters during a demonstration on June 14, 2012, outside the Supreme Constitutional Court in Cairo. Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marwan Naamani/AFP/Getty Images

In Post-Revolution Egypt, Fears Of Police Abuse Deepening

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Egyptian Women Speak Out Against Sexual Violence At Protests

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Group Of Violent Anarchists Emerges Amid Egypt's Political Turmoil

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Criticism Against Egypt's Opposition Coalition Grows

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Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad visits an Islamic shrine Tuesday in Cairo. He became the first Iranian leader to visit Egypt since the 1970s. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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Amr Nabil/AP

For The First Time In Decades, Iran's President Visits Egypt

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Egyptian Cleric's Mission: Spread Salafi Doctrine

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Egyptians Grown Weary Of Ongoing Political Clashes

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Former Salafi Sings About His Identity Crisis

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Tunisia's Veil Ban: Frontline Of Identity War

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Egypt's Military Chief Warns That Protests Could Lead To Collapse Of The State

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A demonstrator shouts anti-government slogans as he stands in front of the Justice Ministry in the Tunisian capital, Tunis, on Nov. 6, 2012, as part of a demonstration by radical Salafi Muslims protesting against the imprisonment of hundreds of Salafist militants. Amine Landoulsi/AP hide caption

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Amine Landoulsi/AP

Tunisia's Salafis: 'A Danger' Or Preachers Of God's Law?

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At Least 40 People Dead In Egypt As Violent Protests Continue

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Egypt's Morsi Declares State Of Emergency

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