Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
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Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers immigration and breaking news.

Rose was among the first to report on the Trump administration's efforts to roll back asylum protections for victims of domestic violence and gangs. He's also covered the separation of migrant families, the legal battle over the travel ban, and the fight over the future of DACA.

He has interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central America, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose has contributed to breaking news coverage of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast, and was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

Story Archive

Harris County, Texas, Sheriff Ed Gonzalez during a 2017 news conference in Crosby, Texas. President Biden has nominated Gonzalez to head U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement as part of an attempt to overhaul the agency. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Biden's Pick To Lead ICE Would Take Over An Agency In Turmoil

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Trump Heads To U.S.-Mexico Border, Days After Kamala Harris Trip

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A woman known in court papers as Ms. A.B. is seeking asylum in the U.S. after suffering more than a decade of domestic violence in El Salvador. Attorney General Merrick Garland is vacating controversial legal decisions his predecessors issued in her case. Kevin D. Liles for NPR hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles for NPR

The Justice Department Overturns Policy That Limited Asylum For Survivors Of Violence

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President Joe Biden speaks during the Democratic National Committee's "Back on Track" drive-in car rally in Duluth, Georgia, to celebrate his 100th day in office. Immigrant advocates were there to protest. EVELYN HOCKSTEIN/REUTERS hide caption

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EVELYN HOCKSTEIN/REUTERS

Biden Wants To End For-Profit Immigrant Detention. His Administration Isn't So Sure

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Biden Has Yet To End The Business Of Detaining Immigrants As He Promised, Critics Say

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Protesters participate March 6 in the "Reunite Our Families Now!'' rally in Los Angeles to protest continued deportations and demand that children be reunited with their families. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Migrants make their way toward a bus after being apprehended near the border between Mexico and the United States in Del Rio, Texas, on Sunday. Sergio Flores/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergio Flores/AFP via Getty Images

NPR/Ipsos Poll: Americans Concerned About Migrants At U.S.-Mexico Border

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Migrants and asylum seekers are seen after spending the night in one of the car lanes off the San Ysidro Crossing Port on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana on April 24, 2021. A group of migrants asked U.S. migration authorities to allow them to start their migration process and decided to stay at the crossing port to pressure for a solution to their situation. Guillermo Arias /AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias /AFP via Getty Images

As More Migrants Arrive, U.S. Expands Efforts To Identify And Admit Most Vulnerable

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Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas speaks during a March 1 news conference at the White House. The Biden administration says four families that were separated at the Mexico border during the Trump administration would be reunited in the U.S. during the first week of May. It's the first of what Mayorkas calls "just the beginning" of a broader effort. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Separated Families To Reunite In The U.S. As Immigrant Advocates Push For More

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Ms. A.B. had been allowed to stay in the U.S. for years while her case is pending. She requested that NPR identify her only by her initials because she is afraid her ex-husband might find her. Kevin D. Liles for NPR hide caption

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Kevin D. Liles for NPR

Domestic Abuse Survivors Fear Deportation Under Trump Policy Biden Has Yet To Reverse

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The Adelanto U.S. Immigration and Enforcement Processing Center in Adelanto, Calif., is operated by GEO Group, Inc., a Florida-based company specializing in privatized corrections. The facility is one of 39 recommended by the ACLU for closure. Chris Carlson/AP hide caption

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Chris Carlson/AP