Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
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Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He primarily covers transportation, as well as breaking news.

On this beat, Rose covers anything that moves — planes, trains, cars, trucks, bicycles, and more — and the people who make them go. His reporting focuses on traffic and pedestrian safety, the transition to electric vehicles, and an air travel system under stress.

Since joining NPR in 2011, Rose has covered immigration for the network and worked as a general assignment reporter in New York City. He was part of a team of NPR journalists who were finalists for the duPont-Columbia Award for reporting on the Trump administration's "Remain in Mexico" policy, and traveled to Honduras to report on how climate change is reshaping migration.

Rose has interviewed grieving parents after the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central and South America, and a long list of musicians including Tom Waits, Solomon Burke, India.Arie, Sixto Rodriguez and Arcade Fire.

Breaking news coverage has taken him across the country: from the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, to major hurricanes in Florida, Louisiana, New York and North Carolina, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin and Eric Garner.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money and Up First podcasts, and contributed to NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

Story Archive

Thursday

A Southwest Boeing 737 Max 8 jet prepares to land at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport in March, 2019. A similar jet experienced a rare but potentially dangerous event known as a Dutch roll last month. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Tuesday

Boeing is in talks to buy Spirit AeroSystems, the supplier that builds the fuselage of the 737 at its factory in Wichita, Kan. Courtesy of Spirit AeroSystems hide caption

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Courtesy of Spirit AeroSystems

Wichita Air Capital

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Friday

A FedEx Boeing 767 cargo plane similar to this one, seen here in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., almost collided with a Southwest jet at the international airport in Austin, Texas, last year. Safety investigators say an air traffic controller's mistake was to blame and that critical safety technology might have prevented the incident. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

Safety investigators want more technology to prevent close calls on runways

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Tuesday

The unfinished fuselage of a Boeing 737 at the Spirit AeroSystems factory in Wichita, Kan. Courtesy of/Spirit AeroSystems hide caption

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Courtesy of/Spirit AeroSystems

Inside the factory where a key Boeing supplier builds the fuselage for the 737

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Thursday

The Federal Aviation Administration says it will continue to hold Boeing accountable after reviewing "the company’s roadmap to fix its systemic safety and quality-control issues." The 90-day review follows the in-flight door plug blowout on an Alaska Airlines 737 Max in January. Boeing finishes final assembly of its jets at at its facility in Renton, Wash. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Boeing promises big changes as the plane maker looks to rebuild trust and quality

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Tuesday

The 'diverging diamond interchange' may come soon to a busy intersection near you

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The state put the first diverging diamond at a notoriously traffic-clogged intersection in Springfield where it could often take as long as 20 minutes to make a left turn. Whitney Shefte for NPR hide caption

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Whitney Shefte for NPR

Saturday

Boeing held its annual shareholders meeting amid a string of controversies

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Friday

Troubled plane-maker Boeing holds its annual shareholders meeting on Friday

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Thursday

On the set of United Airlines' new onboard safety video in Montreal, Canada. Courtesy of United Airlines hide caption

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Courtesy of United Airlines

With flyers more distracted than ever, United rolls out a rebooted safety video

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Why United Airlines is rolling out a rebooted safety video

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Tuesday

The U.S. Justice Department says Boeing broke a deferred prosecution deal with the government following a pair of fatal 737 Max crashes more than five years ago. Samuel Corum/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Getty Images

DOJ says Boeing broke deal that avoided prosecution after 2 fatal 737 Max crashes

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In this aerial view, a steel truss from the destroyed Francis Scott Key Bridge that was pinning the container ship Dali in place was detached from the ship using a controlled detonation of explosives in the Patapsco River on Monday in Baltimore, Md. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

A Japan Airlines jet burst into flames after colliding with a Japanese coast guard plane at Tokyo's Haneda Airport in January. All 379 people on board the Japan Airlines flight were safely evacuated, but the incident raised questions about evacuation standards. STR/Jiji Press/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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STR/Jiji Press/AFP via Getty Images

Thursday

Joshua Dean, who died on Tuesday, had gone public with his concerns about defects and quality-control problems at Spirit AeroSystems, a major supplier of parts for Boeing. Here, a Spirit AeroSystems logo is seen on a 737 fuselage sent to Boeing's factory in Renton, Wash., in January. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images

Whistleblower Joshua Dean, who raised concerns about Boeing jets, dies at 45

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Salvage crews in Baltimore continue to remove wreckage from the Dali on April 26, one month after the cargo ship smashed into the Francis Scott Key Bridge and caused it to collapse. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Who will pay to replace Baltimore's Key Bridge? The legal battle has already begun

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Thursday

Catherine Berthet of France, whose daughter Camille was killed in the 2019 crash of Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302, speaks Wednesday alongside other family members of victims after meeting with Justice Department officials. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

After two Boeing 737 Max crashes, families are still seeking answers from DOJ

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Families push Justice Department to hold Boeing accountable for 737 Max crashes

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Wednesday

Monday

The air traffic control tower at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York City. Federal regulators are increasing the amount of required rest between shifts for air traffic controllers. Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael M. Santiago/Getty Images

Friday

A Boeing 787 Dreamliner accelerates down the runway during its first flight in December, 2009 in Everett, Wash. Stephen Brashear/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Another Boeing whistleblower says he faced retaliation for reporting 'shortcuts'

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Tuesday

Monday

United Airlines is asking pilots to take unpaid leave next month because of a shortage of new Boeing planes. Boeing has slowed deliveries of 737 Max jets because of manufacturing concerns. Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Jason Redmond/AFP via Getty Images