Joel Rose Joel Rose is a National Desk correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a National Desk Correspondent based at NPR's New York bureau.

Rose's reporting often focuses on immigration, criminal justice, technology and culture. He's interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut, resettled refugees in Buffalo, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast for a story on smart guns. He was part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis's visit to the US. He's also contributed to breakings news coverage of the mass shooting at Mother Bethel AME Church in Charleston, South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

Before coming to NPR, Rose worked a number of jobs in public radio. He spent a decade in Philadelphia, including six years as a reporter at member station WHYY. He was also a producer at KQED in San Francisco and American Routes in New Orleans.

Rose has a bachelor's degree in history and music from Brown University, where he got his start in broadcasting as an overnight DJ at the college radio station.

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Story Archive

Trump Immigration Crackdown Strains Resources

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TV journalist Neha Mahajan could lose her work permit if the Trump administration ends a special program for the spouses of H-1B guest workers. Gunjesh Desai/Courtesy of Neha Mahajan hide caption

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Gunjesh Desai/Courtesy of Neha Mahajan

High-Skilled Immigrants Call Out The Trump Administration's 'Hypocrisy'

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DHS Proposes Denying Green Cards To Immigrants Who Use Public Aid

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Trump Administration Seeks To Limit Immigration Status Based On Use Of Public Aid

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Immigration authorities have been skipping a step in the process: When they served notices to appear in court, they routinely left the court date blank. Because of that omission and a recent Supreme Court decision, tens of thousands of deportation cases could be delayed, or tossed out altogether. Liam James Doyle/NPR hide caption

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Liam James Doyle/NPR

Supreme Court Ruling Means Thousands Of Deportation Cases May Be Tossed Out

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ACLU Says New Agreement Will Give Separated Parents Chance To Claim Asylum

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Asylum seekers line up at the San Ysidro port of entry in Tijuana, Mexico. The ACLU announced today a preliminary agreement with the Trump administration to allow some parents already in the U.S. but separated from their children at the border to apply for asylum. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Trump Administration Proposes Regulations To Put Migrant Children In Detention Indefinitely

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Trump Administration Proposes To Allow For Longer Detention Of Migrant Children

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Children and workers are seen at a tent encampment built near the Tornillo Port of Entry in June in Tornillo, Texas. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Supporters of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act and others demonstrate outside the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in Pasadena, Calif., in May. The Trump administration failed to convince a U.S. appeals court that it was justified in ending the program, but a Texas judge on Friday ruled in a separate case that DACA was likely illegal. Reed Saxon/AP hide caption

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Reed Saxon/AP

Mariee Juárez and her mother Yazmin Juárez. Mariee died after being detained along with her mother at the South Texas Family Residential Center in Dilley, Texas Courtesy Yazmin Juárez hide caption

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Courtesy Yazmin Juárez

A Toddler's Death Adds To Concerns About Migrant Detention

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A woman packs crates at a weekly free food pantry in the Bronx in New York City. The Trump administration is considering penalizing legal immigrants for using government benefits such as Medicaid and food stamps. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Trump Administration Moves To Penalize Immigrants For Using Government Benefits

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Joel Silver is far left in the black t-shirt and sunglasses. And Buzzy Hellring is in the middle (under the cup) also in the black t-shirt and sunglasses. Courtesy of Heidi Hellring hide caption

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Courtesy of Heidi Hellring

1968 Created The 'Ultimate' Anti-Sport Sport

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