Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
Stories By

Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers immigration and breaking news.

Rose was among the first to report on the Trump administration's efforts to roll back asylum protections for victims of domestic violence and gangs. He's also covered the separation of migrant families, the legal battle over the travel ban, and the fight over the future of DACA.

He has interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central America, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose has contributed to breaking news coverage of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast, and was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

Story Archive

The Biden administration prepares for the end of Title 42

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137495938/1137501916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Federal judge blocks the pandemic border restrictions known as Title 42

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1137011997/1137040076" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Homeland Security Secretary testifies as immigrant advocates race to pass new laws

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1136931304/1136942346" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Fernando Llerenas picks pears in Hood River, Oregon on Aug. 13, 2021. MICHAEL HANSON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
MICHAEL HANSON/AFP via Getty Images

Farmers and immigrant advocates hold out hope for compromise in lame duck session

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1135190249/1135190396" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Venezuelan migrants are among those lining up to receive clothing, food and haircuts at the Church of the Holy Apostles in Manhattan earlier this month. José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR

The U.S. admitted thousands of Venezuelan migrants. Many are now stuck in legal limbo

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1130026634/1130032055" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Victor Villegas, Milagros Pineda, Daniel Villegas, and Leiver Villegas, stand for a portrait in Brooklyn, New York, U.S., on Tuesday, October 11, 2022. José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
José A. Alvarado Jr. for NPR

The U.S. creates a legal pathway for Venezuelan migrants, but many won't qualify

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1129295198/1129295199" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The number of Venezuelan migrants attempting to get into the U.S. is soaring

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1128624020/1128624021" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lawsuits involving Florida Gov. DeSantis' migrant relocation flights move forward

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1126627012/1126627013" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Texas Rangers investigate the killing of a migrant and the wounding of another

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1126282694/1126282695" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Migrants waiting to be picked up by the U.S. Border Patrol under an international bridge in Eagle Pass, Texas, earlier this month. Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR

Migrant deaths at the U.S.-Mexico border hit a record high, in part due to drownings

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1125638107/1125859546" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Immigration is a divisive issue, but most Americans agree on certain points

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1125024784/1125024785" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Venezuelan migrants Kimberly González and Denny Velasco and their children wait for a bus at Mission: Border Hope in Eagle Pass, Texas. Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR

A dramatic shift at the border as migrants converge on a remote corner of South Texas

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124561261/1124687479" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Avoiding big U.S. crossing points, migrants are now going through remote Texas towns

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1124590340/1124590341" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript