Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
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Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers immigration and breaking news.

Rose was among the first to report on the Trump administration's efforts to roll back asylum protections for victims of domestic violence and gangs. He's also covered the separation of migrant families, the legal battle over the travel ban, and the fight over the future of DACA.

He has interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central America, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose has contributed to breaking news coverage of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast, and was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

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Story Archive

Biden Administration Limits ICE's Ability To Arrest And Deport Certain Non-Citizens

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A U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officer looks on during an operation in Escondido, Calif., in 2019. The Biden administration today announced new guidelines that are expected to sharply limit arrests and deportations carried out by ICE. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

A Look At How Biden Could Rebuild The Asylum System

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Here Are The Immigration Actions President Biden Plans To Sign

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Senate Confirms Alejandro Mayorkas, First Immigrant And First Latino To Lead DHS

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President Biden signed three executive orders related to immigration on Tuesday. His aides said work to reverse his predecessor's immigration policies has only just begun. Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP via Getty Images

The Rio Grande as seen from the Gateway International Bridge in Matamoros, Mexico, in 2019. A mother and her four daughters from Honduras crossed the river nearly three years ago to seek asylum. The daughters were released from a federally funded shelter and placed with their father in Virginia. Their mother is in a shelter in Honduras. Veronica G. Cardenas/AP hide caption

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Veronica G. Cardenas/AP

Families Separated At Border Hope Biden Reunites Them, Bringing Deported Parents Back

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In Flurry Of Executive Orders, Biden Reverses Some Of Trump's Immigration Policies

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Pamela and Afshin Raghebi celebrate a birthday together. Afshin, who was born in Iran, has been stuck overseas, away from his U.S. citizen wife, for more than two years after he flew abroad for an interview at a U.S. Consulate as part of his green card application. Pamela Raghebi hide caption

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Pamela Raghebi

Legacy Of President Trump's Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

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Legacy Of Travel Ban Will Be Hard For Biden To Erase

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A car with a flag endorsing the QAnon conspiracy theory drives by as supporters of President Trump gather for a rally outside the Governor's Residence in St. Paul, Minn., on Nov. 14. Stephen Maturen/Getty Images hide caption

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Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Even If It's 'Bonkers,' Poll Finds Many Believe QAnon And Other Conspiracy Theories

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Migrants from Haiti, Africa, and Central America wait to see if their number will be called to cross the border and apply for asylum in the United States, at the El Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, in September 2019. Emilio Espejel/AP hide caption

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Emilio Espejel/AP

TK TK/TK hide caption

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TK/TK

Dozens Of Women Allege Unwanted Surgeries And Medical Abuse In ICE Custody

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Katalin Karikó works at BioNTech, the company that partnered with Pfizer to make the first COVID-19 vaccine to get emergency authorization in the United States. Jessica Kourkounis hide caption

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Jessica Kourkounis

If COVID-19 Vaccines Bring An End To The Pandemic, America Has Immigrants To Thank

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Robbie Basho helped pioneer the American Primitive style of guitar playing. Now his personal recordings — long thought lost — are being released for the first time. Jeff Dooley/Tompkins Square Records hide caption

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Jeff Dooley/Tompkins Square Records

'Song Of The Avatars' Resurrects Guitarist Robbie Basho's Lost Recordings

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