Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
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Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers immigration and breaking news.

Rose was among the first to report on the Trump administration's efforts to roll back asylum protections for victims of domestic violence and gangs. He's also covered the separation of migrant families, the legal battle over the travel ban, and the fight over the future of DACA.

He has interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central America, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose has contributed to breaking news coverage of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast, and was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

Story Archive

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis speaks at the Conservative Political Action Conference in February. DeSantis signed a law last week aimed in part at limiting the number of migrant children flown into the state. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

'Ghost flights' are the latest GOP effort to weaponize immigration ahead of midterms

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DACA is turning 10 years old, but the program's future is precarious

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Homeland Security Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas at the Summit of the Americas in Los Angeles this week. A federal judge has blocked a set of immigration enforcement priorities that Mayorkas championed. PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PATRICK T. FALLON/AFP via Getty Images

Morgan Bennett of Jamaica is a student guest worker at Funland, a beachside amusement park in Rehoboth Beach, Del. For the first time since the pandemic began, international student workers will be a big part of the park's staff. Chris Darr hide caption

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Chris Darr

As foreign workers return, economists see help for labor shortages and inflation

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A federal judge rules that pandemic border restrictions must continue

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Immigrant advocates say using the word 'invasion' fuels extremism

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Migrants and asylum seekers protest outside the United States Consulate against the public health order known as Title 42, in Tijuana, Mexico, on May 19. Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Guillermo Arias/AFP via Getty Images

Texas Gov. Abbott's migration crackdown hasn't exactly gone as he planned

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Migrants seeking asylum walk toward U.S. Border Patrol agents after crossing the Rio Grande into La Joya, Texas, earlier this month. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Title 42 was meant to slow COVID at the border. It's being used to manage migration

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The future of Title 42

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The White House is dropping COVID border restrictions. Republicans want them to stay

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The State Department makes it easier for anyone to help resettle refugees

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