Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
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Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers immigration and breaking news.

Rose was among the first to report on the Trump administration's efforts to roll back asylum protections for victims of domestic violence and gangs. He's also covered the separation of migrant families, the legal battle over the travel ban, and the fight over the future of DACA.

He has interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central America, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose has contributed to breaking news coverage of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast, and was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

Story Archive

Immigration is a divisive issue, but most Americans agree on certain points

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Venezuelan migrants Kimberly González and Denny Velasco and their children wait for a bus at Mission: Border Hope in Eagle Pass, Texas. Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR hide caption

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Verónica G. Cárdenas for NPR

A dramatic shift at the border as migrants converge on a remote corner of South Texas

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Avoiding big U.S. crossing points, migrants are now going through remote Texas towns

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Rafael Eduardo an undocumented immigrant from Venezuela hugs another immigrant outside of the Saint Andrews Episcopal Church, on Marthas Vineyard on September 15th 2022. Dominic Chavez for The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Dominic Chavez for The Washington Post via Getty Images

50 migrants arrive at Martha's Vineyard airport, sent from Texas by DeSantis

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A young girl is shown staying at a shelter on Martha's Vineyard, Mass., after she and dozens of other migrants arrived by plane unannounced Wednesday. Eve Zuckoff/WCAI hide caption

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Eve Zuckoff/WCAI

The woman identified in court papers as Esther (far right) was among Haitian migrants who say they were threatened by Border Patrol agents on horseback last September as they tried to return to a makeshift camp in Del Rio, Texas. PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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PAUL RATJE/AFP via Getty Images

After Del Rio, some Haitian migrants found safety in the U.S. But many have not

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Many Americans falsely think migrants are bringing most of the fentanyl entering U.S.

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A migrant family is apprehended by U.S. Border Patrol agents and National Guard troops in Eagle Pass, Texas, near the border with Mexico on June 30, 2022. CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images

A majority of Americans see an 'invasion' at the southern border, NPR poll finds

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Blake Masters, a Republican candidate for the U.S. Senate in Arizona, speaks to supporters during a campaign event in Tucson. Brandon Bell/Getty Images hide caption

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Brandon Bell/Getty Images

Talk of 'invasion' moves from the fringe to the mainstream of GOP immigration message

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Border agents used 'unnecessary' force on Haitian migrants, investigation finds

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Supreme Court Curbs Environmental Protection Agency's Power To Protect Environment

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Immigration advocates are cheering the Supreme Court's decision on 'Remain in Mexico'

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The Biden administration may end 'Remain in Mexico' policy, Supreme Court rules

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