Joel Rose Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk.
Joel Rose
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Joel Rose

Nickolai Hammar/NPR
Joel Rose
Nickolai Hammar/NPR

Joel Rose

Correspondent, National Desk

Joel Rose is a correspondent on NPR's National Desk. He covers immigration and breaking news.

Rose was among the first to report on the Trump administration's efforts to roll back asylum protections for victims of domestic violence and gangs. He's also covered the separation of migrant families, the legal battle over the travel ban, and the fight over the future of DACA.

He has interviewed grieving parents after the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, asylum-seekers fleeing from violence and poverty in Central America, and a long list of musicians including Solomon Burke, Tom Waits and Arcade Fire.

Rose has contributed to breaking news coverage of the mass shooting at Emanuel AME Church in South Carolina, Hurricane Sandy and its aftermath, and major protests after the deaths of Trayvon Martin in Florida and Eric Garner in New York.

He's also collaborated with NPR's Planet Money podcast, and was part of NPR's Peabody Award-winning coverage of the Ebola outbreak in 2014.

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Story Archive

Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez were recovery workers in Midland, Mich., after two dam collapses flooded the area. Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez hide caption

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Armando Negron and Bellaliz Gonzalez

'We Were Treated Worse Than Animals': Disaster Recovery Workers Confront COVID-19

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More than 4,000 foreign-born doctors officially begin their residencies at hospitals across the United States today. They'll confront two historic challenges: The coronavirus pandemic and some of the most restrictive immigration policies this nation has seen in decades. smartboy10/DigitalVision Vectors/GettyImages hide caption

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smartboy10/DigitalVision Vectors/GettyImages

Foreign-Born Doctors Start Their Residencies At U.S. Hospitals Amid The Pandemic

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Big Business Opposes President Trump's New Limits On Foreign Workers

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The History Of The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Policy

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NPR reviewed a database of thousands of contracting actions connected to the COVID-19 public health crisis and identified more than 250 companies that got federal contracts worth more than $1 million without going through a fully competitive bidding process. diane555/Getty Images hide caption

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Feds Spend Billions On COVID-19 Contracts, Often Without Fully Competitive Bidding

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Medical personnel test people in vehicles for COVID-19, at Annandale High School, in Annandale, Va., on May 23. There's a new bottleneck emerging in coronavirus testing: A shortage of the machines that process the tests and give results. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Coronavirus Testing Machines Are Latest Bottleneck In Troubled Supply Chain

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Immigration To The U.S. Comes To A Standstill During The Pandemic

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Construction at the COVID-19 field hospital at McCormick Place in Chicago on April 10. The city pared back plans for a 3,000-bed temporary hospital at the nation's largest convention center as infection numbers decreased. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

U.S. Field Hospitals Stand Down, Most Without Treating Any COVID-19 Patients

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Inmates are seen at the Hudson County Correctional Center in Kearny, N.J. in 2015. Eduardo Munoz/Reuters hide caption

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

Internal ICE Reviews Of Two Immigrant Deaths Stoke Fears About COVID-19 Care

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President Trump Is Considering Pausing Immigration To U.S.

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Putting The Protests Against Coronavirus Lockdowns In Context

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A protester waves a placard during a car protest against the stay-at-home order issued by Colorado Gov. Jared Polis to stem the spread of the new coronavirus on April 19 in Denver. David Zalubowski/AP hide caption

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Frustration Mounts With Stay-At-Home Orders As Weeks Turn To Months

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Protesters Across The Country Demand COVID-19 Restrictions Be Lifted

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Vice President Mike Pence speaks as he leads a video teleconference with governors about the coronavirus, during a trip to FEMA on March 23. the Federal Emergency Management Agency is keeping a tight grip on critical medical supplies leaving the country – and coming in from overseas. This has frustrated states who are in need of masks, gowns, ventilators and other medical supplies. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

A 'War' For Medical Supplies: States Say FEMA Wins By Poaching Orders

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