Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is a former producer with Morning Edition.
Ashley
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Ashley Westerman

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Ashley
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Ashley Westerman

Former Producer, Morning Edition

Ashley Westerman is a former producer who occasionally directed the show. She joined the staff in June 2015 and produced a variety of stories, including a coal mine closing near her hometown, the 2016 Republican National Convention and the Rohingya refugee crisis in southern Bangladesh. During her time at NPR, Ashley also produced for All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. She also occasionally reported on both domestic and international news.

Ashley was a summer intern in 2011 with Morning Edition and pitched a story on her very first day. She went on to work as a reporter and host for member station 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she earned awards covering everything from healthcare to jambalaya.

Ashley is an East-West Center 2018 Jefferson Fellow and a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists. Through ICFJ, she has covered labor issues in her home country of the Philippines for NPR and health care in Appalachia for Voice of America.

Story Archive

With a trip to Kyiv, NATO foreign ministers underscore their commitment to Ukraine

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Yevhenia Podvoiska and Tatiana Kuznetsova, from left, both policewomen, steer and navigate a drone during class in Kyiv on Oct. 27. Students must learn to work in pairs: a pilot and a navigator. Julian Hayda/NPR hide caption

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Julian Hayda/NPR

Ukrainian women have started learning a crucial war skill: how to fly a drone

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A Ukrainian soldier sits on captured Russian mortar shells in the village of Blahodatne, retaken by the Ukrainian Armed Forces a day ago, in Kherson region on Friday. Ukraine's president said special units entered Kherson city and other troops were on the approach. Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters hide caption

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Valentyn Ogirenko/Reuters

A new school in Kyiv is training women to pilot drones

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Katie-Jo Page sits in a room she has prepared for Mykyta, a Ukrainian boy her family was in the process of adopting, in Snohomish, Wash., on Oct 2. Annie Tritt for NPR hide caption

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Annie Tritt for NPR

These families were adopting Ukrainian orphans. Now they have to wait out Russia's war

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A helicopter drops water to stop fire on Crimean Bridge connecting the Russian mainland and Crimean peninsula over the Kerch Strait on Saturday. AP hide caption

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AP

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has stopped all foreign adoptions of Ukrainian children

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Tourists by the boulevard at a Black Sea resort in Odesa, Ukraine, on Sept. 3. Tourists are not allowed to enter the public beach due to the presence of land mines and other explosives. Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Dominika Zarzycka/NurPhoto via Getty Images

With Ukraine at war, officials hope to bring tourism back to areas away from fighting

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Yaroslav Holovatenko (left) and a friend with their McDonald's meals in Kyiv on Wednesday. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

McDonald's reopens in Ukraine, feeding customers' nostalgia — and future hopes

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Local residents gather on Tuesday to receive humanitarian aid in Balakliia, a town recently liberated by the Ukrainian military as part of its counteroffensive in the Kharkiv region. Vyacheslav Madiyevskyy/NurPhoto via Reuters hide caption

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Vyacheslav Madiyevskyy/NurPhoto via Reuters

Their town now freed from Russian occupation, Ukrainians feel shock and joy

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Ukrainians in a recently liberated area talk about their life under Russian control

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After 6 months of occupation, a small Ukrainian town has been liberated

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U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken talks with Marina, 6, from Ukraine's Kherson region, during his visit to a children's hospital in Kyiv on Thursday. Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

War has decimated tourism in Ukraine, but people are still determined to travel

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