Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is a producer with Morning Edition.
Stories By

Ashley Westerman

Ashley Westerman

Producer, Morning Edition

Ashley Westerman is a producer who occasionally directs the show. Since joining the staff in June 2015, she has produced a variety of stories including a coal mine closing near her hometown, the 2016 Republican National Convention, and the Rohingya refugee crisis in southern Bangladesh. She is also an occasional reporter for Morning Edition, and NPR.org, where she has contributed reports on both domestic and international news.

Ashley was a summer intern in 2011 with Morning Edition and pitched a story on her very first day. She went on to work as a reporter and host for member station 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she earned awards covering everything from healthcare to jambalaya.

Ashley is an East-West Center 2018 Jefferson Fellow and a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists. Through ICFJ, she has covered labor issues in her home country of the Philippines for NPR and health care in Appalachia for Voice of America.

[+] read more[-] less

Story Archive

Handlers, known as mahouts, ride elephants along a mountain ridge at the Elephant Conservation Center in Xayaboury, Laos. The center has 29 elephants, most of which spent long careers hauling logs in Laos' logging industry. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Westerman/NPR

A Chinese-backed power plant under construction in 2018 in the desert in the Tharparkar district of Pakistan's southern Sindh province. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why Is China Placing A Global Bet On Coal?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716347646/718259676" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Giant concrete pylons rise from the Mekong River north of Luang Prabang, where a bridge is under construction. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ashley Westerman/NPR

In Laos, A Chinese-Funded Railway Sparks Hope For Growth — And Fears Of Debt

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/707091267/717558917" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

What China's Belt And Road Means For Elephants In Laos

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/717389591/717389592" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Students hold placards as they shout slogans during a protest at the state university in Manila, Philippines, on Thursday in support of Rappler CEO Maria Ressa, who was arrested a day earlier. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Myanmar Army Maj. Gen. Tun Tun Nyi (left), Maj. Gen. Soe Naing Oo (center) and Maj. Gen. Zaw Min Tun (right) attend a military press conference on Jan. 18. Myanmar's army said it killed 13 ethnic Rakhine fighters after the armed group carried out deadly attacks on police posts. Thet Aung/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Thet Aung/AFP/Getty Images

Verlon Jose, vice chairman of the Tohono O'odham Nation, says President Trump's proposed wall would devastate his community. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Claire Harbage/NPR

Native American Leader: 'A Wall Is Not The Answer'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/685812553/687619780" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The main cast of Kim's Convenience (from left): Simu Liu (Jung), Jean Yoon (Umma), Paul Sun-Hyung Lee (Appa), Andrea Bang (Janet), Andrew Phung (Kimchi), Nicole Power (Shannon Ross). Season 3 debuted on the CBC on Tuesday. Canadian Broadcasting Corp. hide caption

toggle caption
Canadian Broadcasting Corp.

'Kim's Convenience' Is A Sitcom About Asian Immigrants — With Depth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/682888290/683501489" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman walks past a television in New Taipei City showing China's leader Xi Jinping making a speech commemorating the 40th anniversary of a message sent to Taiwan in 1979. In his speech, Xi Jinping said Taiwan's unification with the mainland is "inevitable" and warned against any efforts to promote the island's independence. Sam Yeh /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Sam Yeh /AFP/Getty Images

Men use tablets and laptops to check news at a coffee shop in Hanoi in 2014. Today almost half of Vietnam's population of over 95 million have access to the Internet. A new and controversial cybersecurity law goes into effect nationwide Tuesday. Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Hoang Dinh Nam/AFP/Getty Images

Letitia James (center) is sworn in as New York's 67th Attorney General in a ceremony Monday night at the state capitol in Albany. James is the state's first black attorney general, as well as the first woman to hold the state-wide elected office. New York State Office of the Attorney General hide caption

toggle caption
New York State Office of the Attorney General

Bangladeshi Prime Minister Sheikh Hasina flashes the victory symbol after casting her vote, as her daughter Saima Wazed Hossain (far left) and her sister Sheikh Rehana look on. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
-/AFP/Getty Images

Bangladesh PM Wins 3rd Term After Violent Election, Accusations Of Rigging

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/681114062/681141751" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Terry Mote (right) visits the home of Stanley and Lorit Jamor in Enid, Okla. Stanley was born on Bikini atoll, and is a descendant of Chief Juda, who was told in 1946 by Commodore Ben H. Wyatt, of the U.S. Navy, to give up the island homeland "for the good of all mankind." Bikini was a main site for U.S. nuclear testing and is uninhabitable to this day because of radioactive contamination. Sarah Craig for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Sarah Craig for NPR

A Policy Knot Leaves Oklahomans From Marshall Islands Struggling To Get Health Care

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/671159555/680021724" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript