Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is an associate producer with Morning Edition.

Ashley Westerman

Assistant Producer, Morning Edition

Ashley Westerman is an associate producer who occasionally directs the show. Since joining the staff in June 2015, she has produced coverage of a coal mine closing near her hometown, the 2016 Republican National Convention and the Rohingya refugee crisis in southern Bangladesh. Ages ago (2011), Ashley was a summer intern with Morning Edition and pitched a story on her very first day. She went on to work as reporter and host for member station 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, La., where she earned awards covering everything from healthcare to jambalaya. Ashley is a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists. Through its programs, she has covered labor issues in her home country of the Philippines for NPR and health care in Appalachia for Voice of America. She tweets @NPRAshley.

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Myanmar State Counselor Aung San Suu Kyi, in a national address in September, said she felt deeply for the suffering of all people caught up in conflict scorching through Rakhine state — in her first comments that also mentioned Muslims displaced by violence. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

Jeepneys, often known in the Philippines as "King of the Road," join traffic on a busy street in Manila last May. Authorities are moving to phase them out, citing pollution and safety concerns. Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noel Celis/AFP/Getty Images

A Push To Modernize Philippine Transport Threatens The Beloved Jeepney

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Aung San Suu Kyi (center), poses with Bill Richardson (2nd right) and other members of the Advisory Commission on Rakhine State after their meeting in Myanmar on Monday. Myanmar State Counsellor Office via AP hide caption

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Myanmar State Counsellor Office via AP

A rosca de reyes cake on display at a bakery in Mexico City. The cake is the signature dish of Three Kings Day celebrations in many parts of Latin America. Jam Media/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images hide caption

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Jam Media/CON/LatinContent/Getty Images

U.S. Bakeries Grab A Slice Of A Latin American Tradition: 3 Kings Cake

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Military trucks drive past destroyed buildings and a mosque in what had been the center of fighting in Marawi on the southern Philippine island of Mindanao on Oct. 25, days after the military declared that the battle against ISIS-linked militants was over. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Rohingya activist Abdul Rasheed says his people can only be repatriated back to their homes in Myanmar if the government can guarantee their safety, security and dignity. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

People eat at a noodle stall at the Han Market in the central Vietnamese city of Danang in November. Vietnamese respondents to the Pew Research Center survey overwhelmingly said life is better than it was 50 years ago. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

The prize-winning trio mix their Maori culture with heavy metal. Lisa Crandall/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Lisa Crandall/Courtesy of the artist

This New Zealand Band Is Trying To Save Maori Culture One Head Banger At A Time

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Will Byers (Noah Schnapp) returns in the second season of Stranger Things. Courtesy of Netflix hide caption

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Courtesy of Netflix

'Stranger Things 2' Creators: 'We Wanted To Raise The Stakes'

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#MeToo Campaign Encourages More Abused Women To Say 'Me Too'

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Monovithya Kem's father, Cambodian opposition leader Kem Sokha, was jailed in September, after his party fared better than expected in local elections in June. "Dictators see free, fair elections as a threat," she tells NPR. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

'Fear Is Something Constant,' Says Daughter Of Jailed Cambodian Opposition Leader

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Matt Oehrlein and Gui Cavalcanti, co-founders of the robotics company, MegaBots, with giant robots MK2 (left) and Eagle Prime. Greg Munson hide caption

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Greg Munson

No Rock 'Em Sock 'Em Here: Behold A U.S. Vs. Japan Giant Robot Duel

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Reporters of the English-laguage newspaper Cambodia Daily watch a video clip featuring Cambodian opposition leader Kem Sokha at their newsroom in Phnom Penh on September 3, 2017. One of Cambodia's last remaining independent newspapers, the paper announced on Sept. 3, that it was closing after 24 years, the latest in a series of blows to critics of strongman prime minister Hun Sen. Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tang Chhin Sothy/AFP/Getty Images

Cambodia's Prime Minister Hun Sen speaks to garment workers during a visit to a factory outside Phnom Penh on Aug. 30. His government has slapped the English-language Cambodia Daily with a $6.3 million tax bill and ordered it to pay by Sept. 4. If it doesn't, Hun Sen said, it should "pack up and go." Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP