Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is an associate producer with Morning Edition.
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Ashley Westerman

Ashley Westerman

Associate Producer, Morning Edition

Ashley Westerman is an associate producer who occasionally directs the show. Since joining the staff in June 2015, she has produced a variety of stories including a coal mine closing near her hometown, the 2016 Republican National Convention, and the Rohingya refugee crisis in southern Bangladesh. She is also an occasional reporter for Morning Edition, and NPR.org, where she has contributed reports on both domestic and international news.

Ashley was a summer intern in 2011 with Morning Edition and pitched a story on her very first day. She went on to work as a reporter and host for member station 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she earned awards covering everything from healthcare to jambalaya.

Ashley is an East-West Center 2018 Jefferson Fellow and a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists. Through ICFJ, she has covered labor issues in her home country of the Philippines for NPR and health care in Appalachia for Voice of America.

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A cat's tongue is covered in hundreds of tiny, backward-facing spines called papillae that help to keep the animal clean. Researchers have discovered that papillae are scoop-shaped and hollow, which allows the spines to store and hold saliva. Candler Hobbs/Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Candler Hobbs/Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta/AFP/Getty Images

Chris and Nancy Brown embrace Monday while looking over the remains of their burned residence after the Camp Fire tore through the region in Paradise, Calif. Dozens of people have been killed in the latest fires to hit the state. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

Megafires More Frequent Because Of Climate Change And Forest Management

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Mourners comfort each other Thursday during a vigil at the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza for the victims of the mass shooting at Borderline Bar and Grill in Thousand Oaks, Calif. Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images

Another Mass Shooting? 'Compassion Fatigue' Is A Natural Reaction

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Low Taek Jho, C.E.O., Jynwel Captial Limited and Co-Director Jynwel Charitable Foundation Limited, speaks onstage during The New York Times Health For Tomorrow Conference in San Francisco, Calif., in 2014. Prosecutors accuse Low and a former Goldman Sachs banker with conspiring to launder money embezzled from 1Malaysia Development Berha. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for New York Times hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for New York Times

A Myanmarese soldier guards an area at the Sittwe airport in Rakhine state last week. U.N. investigators last month released a damning and meticulous report detailing why six Myanmar generals should be prosecuted for genocide against the Rohingya Muslim minority. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

The 'Shadowlands' Of Southeast Asia's Illicit Networks: Meth, Dancing Queens And More

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'Crazy Rich Asians' Changes How Asian Males Are Viewed

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In this July 17 photo provided by Aziz Abdul, a man standing on a balcony at the East Lorengau Refugee Transit Center on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea. The question of what will become of the hundreds of asylum-seekers banished by Australia to sweltering immigration camps in the poor Pacific island nations of Papua New Guinea and Nauru has become more pressing. Aziz Abdul via AP hide caption

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Aziz Abdul via AP

An Asylum-Seeker Wrote A Book By Phone Texts From Manus Island Detention

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Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen waves to supporters in Phnom Penh on Friday. Ahead of Sunday's elections, Hun Sen's ruling party has banned the main opposition party, jailed its leaders and other critics and shut independent media outlets. Opposition politicians in exile are urging a boycott. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP

Former Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, shown here in May, has been arrested over questions about corruption involving billions of dollars in a government fund. Vincent Thian/AP hide caption

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Vincent Thian/AP

There aren't hard numbers on who is searching and how many, but many adoption agencies in the U.S. confirm that they've seen an uptick in international adoptees searching for their biological parents over the last decade or so. Angela Hsieh/NPR hide caption

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Angela Hsieh/NPR

Listen: Ashley Westerman Meets Her Birth Mother

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