Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is a producer with Morning Edition.
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Ashley Westerman

The Archies is not only the first fictitious band to reach No. 1 on the Billboard charts in the U.S., but is also the only group to reach such heights without ever performing the song live onstage. GAB Archive/Redferns/Getty Images hide caption

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GAB Archive/Redferns/Getty Images

50 Years Later, The Archies' 'Sugar, Sugar' Is Still 'Really Sweet'

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A local market is seen burning during a protest in Fakfak, West Papua, Indonesia, on Aug. 21. Violent protests this month were sparked by accusations that security forces had arrested Papuan students in East Java. Beawiharta/AP hide caption

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Beawiharta/AP

Violence Follows Pro-Independence Protests In Indonesia's Papua Region

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Bangladeshi commuters use boats to cross the Buriganga River in the capital Dhaka in 2018. In July, Bangladesh's top court granted all the country's rivers the same legal rights as humans. Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

Visitors look at a model of a Saturn V rocket and its launch umbilical tower, which were used during the Apollo moon-landing program, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago this July 20, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Rohingya refugees gather in the "no man's land" behind Myanmar's barbed-wire-lined border in Maungdaw district, Rakhine state, in 2018. Some 700,000 refugees fled into Bangladesh following a brutal crackdown by the Myanmar military in 2017. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images

Nizar Zakka (center), a Lebanese national and U.S. resident arrested in Iran in 2015 and sentenced to 10 years in jail on espionage charges, gives a press conference in Beirut after he was freed in early June. Anwar Amro /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anwar Amro /AFP/Getty Images
Penguin Young Readers

'Patron Saints Of Nothing' Is A Book For 'The Hyphenated'

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Left: Russell Low's relative emigrated from China to work on the Transcontinental Railroad in the U.S. Right: Teng Biao, a civil rights lawyer, fled China in 2014 after he became targeted by the Chinese government for challenging the constitutionality of certain laws. Terray Sylvester/Reuters and May Tse/South China Morning Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Terray Sylvester/Reuters and May Tse/South China Morning Post via Getty Images

Handlers, known as mahouts, ride elephants along a mountain ridge at the Elephant Conservation Center in Xayaboury, Laos. The center has 29 elephants, most of which spent long careers hauling logs in Laos' logging industry. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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A Chinese-backed power plant under construction in 2018 in the desert in the Tharparkar district of Pakistan's southern Sindh province. Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rizwan Tabassum/AFP/Getty Images

Why Is China Placing A Global Bet On Coal?

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Giant concrete pylons rise from the Mekong River north of Luang Prabang, where a bridge is under construction. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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In Laos, A Chinese-Funded Railway Sparks Hope For Growth — And Fears Of Debt

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What China's Belt And Road Means For Elephants In Laos

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Students hold placards as they shout slogans during a protest at the state university in Manila, Philippines, on Thursday in support of Rappler CEO Maria Ressa, who was arrested a day earlier. Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP/Getty Images

Myanmar Army Maj. Gen. Tun Tun Nyi (left), Maj. Gen. Soe Naing Oo (center) and Maj. Gen. Zaw Min Tun (right) attend a military press conference on Jan. 18. Myanmar's army said it killed 13 ethnic Rakhine fighters after the armed group carried out deadly attacks on police posts. Thet Aung/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Thet Aung/AFP/Getty Images