Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is a former producer with Morning Edition.
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Ashley Westerman

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Ashley
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Ashley Westerman

Former Producer, Morning Edition

Ashley Westerman is a former producer who occasionally directed the show. She joined the staff in June 2015 and produced a variety of stories, including a coal mine closing near her hometown, the 2016 Republican National Convention and the Rohingya refugee crisis in southern Bangladesh. During her time at NPR, Ashley also produced for All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. She also occasionally reported on both domestic and international news.

Ashley was a summer intern in 2011 with Morning Edition and pitched a story on her very first day. She went on to work as a reporter and host for member station 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she earned awards covering everything from healthcare to jambalaya.

Ashley is an East-West Center 2018 Jefferson Fellow and a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists. Through ICFJ, she has covered labor issues in her home country of the Philippines for NPR and health care in Appalachia for Voice of America.

Story Archive

Yaroslav Holovatenko (left) and a friend with their McDonald's meals in Kyiv on Wednesday. Ashley Westerman/NPR hide caption

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Ashley Westerman/NPR

McDonald's reopens in Ukraine, feeding customers' nostalgia — and future hopes

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Local residents gather on Tuesday to receive humanitarian aid in Balakliia, a town recently liberated by the Ukrainian military as part of its counteroffensive in the Kharkiv region. Vyacheslav Madiyevskyy/NurPhoto via Reuters hide caption

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Vyacheslav Madiyevskyy/NurPhoto via Reuters

Their town now freed from Russian occupation, Ukrainians feel shock and joy

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Ukrainians in a recently liberated area talk about their life under Russian control

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After 6 months of occupation, a small Ukrainian town has been liberated

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U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken talks with Marina, 6, from Ukraine's Kherson region, during his visit to a children's hospital in Kyiv on Thursday. Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Genya Savilov/Pool/AFP via Getty Images

War has decimated tourism in Ukraine, but people are still determined to travel

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A motorcade transporting the International Atomic Energy Agency expert mission, escorted by the Russian military, arrives at the Zaporizhzhia Nuclear Power Plant amid the conflict in Ukraine, outside the city of Enerhodar, Ukraine, on Thursday. Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters hide caption

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Alexander Ermochenko/Reuters

Ukrainian Emergency Ministry rescuers attend an exercise in the city of Zaporizhzhia on Aug. 17, in case of a possible nuclear incident at the Zaporizhzhia nuclear power plant located near the city. The plant in southern Ukraine came under Russian occupation in the early days of the war. Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Dimitar Dilkoff/AFP via Getty Images

What it's like for Ukrainians working at a nuclear plant under Russian occupation

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A funeral procession in Lviv, Ukraine, in March ends at grave sites where soldiers Viktor Dudar, 44, and Ivan Koverznev, 24, will be buried, as priests say their blessings and mourners look on. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Work goes on inside a Ukrainian nuclear power plant amid threats of Russian bombs

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Ukrainian first lady Olena Zelenska on the front cover of Vogue, photographed by Annie Leibovitz. Entitled "Portrait of Bravery," the spread and accompanying interview paint Zelenska as a woman stepping up to the challenge of her many roles in this war. Screenshot by NPR/Annie Leibovitz/Vogue hide caption

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Screenshot by NPR/Annie Leibovitz/Vogue

Ukraine's first lady posed for 'Vogue' and sparked discussion on how to #SitLikeAGirl

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Ukrainians express worries over conscription following Russia's invasion

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'Vogue' cover of Ukraine's First Lady Olena Zelenska sparks debate and controversy

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Martial law victims including former lawmaker Satur Ocampo (third from left) and their lawyers headed by Howard Calleja (second from left), show documents after filing a petition with the supreme Court in Manila on Wednesday seeking the disqualification of presumptive president Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images