Ashley Westerman Ashley Westerman is a former producer with Morning Edition.
Ashley
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Ashley Westerman

Wanyu Zhang/NPR
Ashley
Wanyu Zhang/NPR

Ashley Westerman

Former Producer, Morning Edition

Ashley Westerman is a former producer who occasionally directed the show. She joined the staff in June 2015 and produced a variety of stories, including a coal mine closing near her hometown, the 2016 Republican National Convention and the Rohingya refugee crisis in southern Bangladesh. During her time at NPR, Ashley also produced for All Things Considered and Weekend Edition. She also occasionally reported on both domestic and international news.

Ashley was a summer intern in 2011 with Morning Edition and pitched a story on her very first day. She went on to work as a reporter and host for member station 89.3 WRKF in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, where she earned awards covering everything from healthcare to jambalaya.

Ashley is an East-West Center 2018 Jefferson Fellow and a two-time reporting fellow with the International Center for Journalists. Through ICFJ, she has covered labor issues in her home country of the Philippines for NPR and health care in Appalachia for Voice of America.

Story Archive

Martial law victims including former lawmaker Satur Ocampo (third from left) and their lawyers headed by Howard Calleja (second from left), show documents after filing a petition with the supreme Court in Manila on Wednesday seeking the disqualification of presumptive president Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Aljibe/AFP via Getty Images

Tina Kotek speaks during Day 1 of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, July 25, 2016. On Tuesday, she won Oregon's gubernatorial Democratic primary. If she wins in November, Kotek will be the nation's first openly lesbian governor. ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

A full moon rises behind the high voltage towers of the El Avila in Caracas, Venezuela, Sunday, May 15. People in the Americas, Europe and Africa had a chance to see the total lunar eclipse that began Sunday night. Matias Delacroix/AP hide caption

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Matias Delacroix/AP

The Tupua Tamasese Meaule Hospital is pictured in Apia, Samoa, on July 10, 2015. Samoa will go into lockdown beginning Saturday as it faces its first outbreak of the coronavirus after a woman who was about to leave the country tested positive. Dean Purcell/AP hide caption

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Dean Purcell/AP

Local security personnel try to grab a banner from supporters of the Cambodia National Rescue Party in front of the Phnom Penh Municipal Court on Thursday in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Heng Sinith/AP hide caption

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Heng Sinith/AP

Villanueva walks together with other priests and their lawyers after appearing in court on Feb. 11, 2021, in Quezon city, Metro Manila, Philippines. Ezra Acayan/Getty Images hide caption

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Ezra Acayan/Getty Images

A priest is helping Philippine families cremate and honor drug war victims at no cost

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The Philippines government hopes a surge in tourists will save its economy

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Tropical Philippines has only one entrant in the Winter Olympics

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The Philippines is lifting its ban on foreign tourists

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In this photo taken on Jan. 20, a beach resort in Tonga, on the outskirts of the capital of Nuku'alofa, shows the impact of the tsunami that hit the island nation in the wake of an underwater volcanic eruption. Aid efforts have been complicated by the pandemic — with only one case of COVID on record, Tonga is wary of outsiders who might bring the virus. Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images hide caption

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Xinhua News Agency via Getty Images

Why Tonga is opting for 'contactless' humanitarian aid

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How the Philippine capital's 'no vaccination, no ride' public transit rule is going

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The first humanitarian aid has arrived in the Pacific nation of Tonga

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The volcano in Tonga is still erupting which could make clean up difficult

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