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A woman recovering from fever linked to COVID-19 checks medications in her home in Mineola, N.Y., this spring. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Nearly Two-Thirds Of U.S. Households Struck By COVID-19 Face Financial Trouble

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U.S. Reaches COVID-19 Milestone: Death Toll Is Over 200,000

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Tom Cooper, Nashville General Hospital's supply chain director, inspects a box of N95 respirators. The hospital is among a small group of pilot sites now sharing data about the inventory of its protective equipment with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Blake Farmer/ WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/ WPLN

Cleanup Continues In Tennessee Where Deadly Tornadoes Struck

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Deadly Tornadoes Rip Through Nashville Area Overnight

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Maria Fabrizio for WPLN

Patients Want To Die At Home, But Home Hospice Care Can Be Tough On Families

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An infant is monitored for opioid withdrawal in a neonatal intensive care unit at the CAMC Women and Children's Hospital in Charleston, W.Va., in June. Infants exposed to opioids in utero often experience symptoms of withdrawal. Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Salwan Georges/The Washington Post/Getty Images

In The Fight For Money For The Opioid Crisis, Will The Youngest Victims Be Left Out?

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At Nashville's "High Five" camp, 12-year-old Priceless Garinger (center), whose right side has been weakened by cerebral palsy, wears a full-length, bright pink cast on her left arm — though that arm's strong and healthy. By using her weaker right arm and hand to decorate a cape, she hopes to gain a stronger grip and fine motor control. Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio hide caption

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Blake Farmer/Nashville Public Radio

At 'High Five' Camp, Struggling With A Disability Is The Point

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John Poynter of Clarksville, Tenn., uses a wall calendar to keep track of all his appointments for both behavioral health and physical ailments. His mental health case manager, Valerie Klein, appears regularly on the calendar — and helps make sure he gets to his diabetes appointments. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Coordinating Care Of Mind And Body Might Help Medicaid Save Money And Lives

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Before it closed March 1, the 25-bed Columbia River Hospital, in Celina, Tenn., served the town of 1,500 residents. The closest hospital now is 18 miles from Celina — a 30-minute or more drive on mountain roads. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Economic Ripples: Hospital Closure Hurts A Town's Ability To Attract Retirees

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Belmont University's nursing program started hiring actors like Vickie James to help with their end-of-life simulations for students. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Morphine, And A Side Of Grief Counseling: Nursing Students Learn How To Handle Death

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Charlotte Potts, who has a history of heart problems, lives within sight of Livingston Regional Hospital. After a recent stint there, she was discharged into the care of a home health agency, and now gets treatment in her apartment for some ailments. Shalina Chatlania / WPLN hide caption

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Shalina Chatlania / WPLN

How Helping Patients Get Good Care At Home Helps Rural Hospitals Survive

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Despite abuse deterrent formulation, Purdue Pharma's OxyContin continues to be used by some people with opioid addiction to get high. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Insurer To Purdue Pharma: We Won't Pay For OxyContin Anymore

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Federal Judge In Texas To Hear States' Case Against Obamacare

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Emergency room doctors face long-term stress, making them especially prone to depression and suicide. Blake Farmer/WPLN hide caption

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Blake Farmer/WPLN

When Doctors Struggle With Suicide, Their Profession Often Fails Them

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