Gregory Warner Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation.
Gregory Warner 2017 square
Stories By

Gregory Warner

Sandy Honig/NPR
Gregory Warner 2017
Sandy Honig/NPR

Gregory Warner

Host, Rough Translation

Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation, a podcast about how things we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other part of the world. Whether interviewing a Ukrainian debunker of Russian fake news, a Japanese apology broker navigating different cultural meanings of the word "sorry," or a German dating coach helping a Syrian refugee find love, Warner's storytelling approach takes us out of our echo chambers and leads us to question the way we talk about the world. Rough Translation has received the Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club and a Scripps Howard Award.

In his role as host, Warner draws on his own overseas experience. As NPR's East Africa correspondent, he covered the diverse issues and voices of a region that experienced unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. Before joining NPR, he reported from conflict zones around the world as a freelancer. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for Radiolab.

Warner has also worked as senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, endeavoring to explain the economics of American health care. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnostics on the doctor-patient relationship, and composed a Suessian poem to explain the correlation between health care job growth and national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won a Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Warner has won a Peabody Award and awards from Edward R. Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, and PRNDI. He earned his degree in English from Yale University.

Story Archive

Marla Ruzicka, in her iconic sheepskin vest, stands in front of bullet-ridden cars in Kabul (March 2002). Kate Brooks/CIVIC hide caption

toggle caption
Kate Brooks/CIVIC

Home/Front: Marla's List

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1014598150/1014732916" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

In this April 7, 2002 photo, Marla Ruzicka leads a demonstration calling for U.S. compensation to victims of the recent military campaign in Afghanistan, outside of the U.S. Embassy in Kabul. SUZANNE PLUNKETT/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

toggle caption
SUZANNE PLUNKETT/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Home/Front: Marla's War

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1011480658/1011509556" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Jamiel Law for NPR

Home/Front: Rebels In The Valley

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1009063340/1009226525" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alicia & Matt Lammers in their home in Deming, New Mexico. Bree Lamb for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bree Lamb for NPR

Home/Front: Battle Borne

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1002957885/1006950115" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Alicia and Matt Lammers walk outside of their home in Deming, New Mexico. Bree Lamb hide caption

toggle caption
Bree Lamb

Home/Front: Battle Lines

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1002957250/1004578980" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Retired Staff Sgt. Matt Lammers holds the hand of his wife, Alicia. Bree Lamb for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Bree Lamb for NPR

Home/Front: Battle Rattle

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1002246591/1002313661" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Tim and Felisa Tim Kirk hide caption

toggle caption
Tim Kirk

War Poems Revisited

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/993647572/993937618" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Global communication specialist Heather Hansen has a stock of English language books that no longer fit her approach to teaching. Heather Hansen hide caption

toggle caption
Heather Hansen

How To Speak Bad English

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/989477444/989574776" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kamel Guemari stands in front of the community center housed in a former McDonald's in Marseille. Eleanor Beardsley hide caption

toggle caption
Eleanor Beardsley

Liberté, Égalité, French Fries... And Couscous

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/984838419/985164584" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Nanjala Nyabola is an academic, traveler, and collector of guidebooks, some of which are pictured here. Nanjala Nyabola hide caption

toggle caption
Nanjala Nyabola

Rewriting The Travel Guidebook With Nanjala Nyabola

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/971101662/971220083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript