Gregory Warner Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation.
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Gregory Warner

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Gregory Warner 2017
Sandy Honig/NPR

Gregory Warner

Host, Rough Translation

Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation, a podcast about how things we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other part of the world. Whether interviewing a Ukrainian debunker of Russian fake news, a Japanese apology broker navigating different cultural meanings of the word "sorry," or a German dating coach helping a Syrian refugee find love, Warner's storytelling approach takes us out of our echo chambers and leads us to question the way we talk about the world. Rough Translation has received the Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club and a Scripps Howard Award.

In his role as host, Warner draws on his own overseas experience. As NPR's East Africa correspondent, he covered the diverse issues and voices of a region that experienced unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. Before joining NPR, he reported from conflict zones around the world as a freelancer. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for Radiolab.

Warner has also worked as senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, endeavoring to explain the economics of American health care. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnostics on the doctor-patient relationship, and composed a Suessian poem to explain the correlation between health care job growth and national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won a Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Warner has won a Peabody Award and awards from Edward R. Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, and PRNDI. He earned his degree in English from Yale University.

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Story Archive

Richard Cizik poses for a photo for Vanity Fair, part of a feature on pro-environment leaders from various backgrounds. Mark Seliger hide caption

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Mark Seliger

The Loneliness Of The Climate Change Christian

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Mauktik Kulkarni (left) and Suraj Yengde (right) as children. Vivekanand Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde/Vivekanand Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde hide caption

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Vivekanand Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde/Vivekanand Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde

Caste Arrives In Silicon Valley

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Mauktik Kulkarni (left) and Suraj Yengde (right) as children. Photos Courtesy of Mauktik Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde hide caption

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Photos Courtesy of Mauktik Kulkarni and Suraj Yengde

How To Be An Anti-Casteist

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Chinese celebrity Xiao Zhan at an event in Nanjing, China, promoting his web drama, The Untamed. VCG via Getty Images hide caption

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VCG via Getty Images

A demonstrator holds a sign reading "Black Pete Is Racism" during a 2013 demonstration in Amsterdam. Zwarte Piet or Black Pete is traditionally depicted by white people wearing blackface, Afro wigs and red lipstick. Bas Czerwinski/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bas Czerwinski/AFP via Getty Images

Lemon Drizzle Cakes And Radio Show: How 1 Irish County Helps Elderly During Pandemic

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A crew of Venezuelans push and carry their belongings along a highway in Ecuador during the pandemic, determined to get home, even if they have to walk. Orlando Pimentel hide caption

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Orlando Pimentel

El Hilo: Walking To Venezuela

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A County Roscommon resident holds a radio provided by the Lions Club and Tesco Supermarket to listen to The Rossie Way. Ciaran Mullooly/RTE hide caption

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Ciaran Mullooly/RTE

'Rough Translation': The Controversial Dutch Character Black Pete

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A protestor at a rally against the Dutch holiday character, Black Pete, in Eindhoven, the Netherlands. Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Romy Arroyo Fernandez/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Protesters march on June 1 in Auckland, New Zealand, in solidarity with demonstrations across the United States following the killing of George Floyd. Aotearoa is the Maori name for New Zealand. Hannah Peters/Getty Images hide caption

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Hannah Peters/Getty Images

As New Zealand Police Pledge To Stay Unarmed, Maori Activists Credit U.S. Protests

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New Zealand Leaders Reconsider Arming Police In The Wake Of George Floyd's Killing

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Syrian artist Aziz Alasmar paints a mural of George Floyd on the remains of a collapsed building in Binnish, a town in Syria's Idlib province. Mohamad Jamalo hide caption

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Mohamad Jamalo

The Global Legacy of George Floyd

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Aysha Abu Shhab (right) and Noam Shuster-Eliassi (second from right) with other COVID-19 patients quarantined by the Israeli military at the Dan Jerusalem Hotel, which became known as "Hotel Corona." Noam Shuster-Eliassi hide caption

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Noam Shuster-Eliassi

'Everybody's Getting Along Here': How 'Hotel Corona' United Israelis And Palestinians

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A new French law requires masks be worn in certain public spaces, but it is still illegal to wear religious attire that covers the face. Halisia Hubbard/NPR hide caption

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Halisia Hubbard/NPR

Listen:

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