Gregory Warner Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation.
Gregory Warner 2017 square
Stories By

Gregory Warner

Kenyan authorities are trying to guard against fraud and violence when they hold a presidential election on March 4. Here, voters register on biometric equipment last December in Nairobi. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

Fearing Election Turmoil, Kenyans Seek A Tech Solution

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/172887340/172905421" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People walk down a market street in Eastleigh, a predominantly Muslim Somali neighborhood in Nairobi, Kenya, in 2009. The neighborhood has come under scrutiny as the U.S. cracks down on terrorism financing. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

True to his name, Swift9 finishes his piece before anyone else: a portrait of Nobel Peace Prize winner Wangari Maathai. Mark Brecke for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Brecke for NPR

Kenya's Graffiti Train Seeks To Promote A Peaceful Election

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/171916072/172373288" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kibomango trains with former child soldier Fabrice Djef. Gregory Warner/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Warner/NPR

Congolese women wait for food to be distributed at the Mugunga III camp for displaced people outside the eastern town of Goma on Dec. 2. Jerome Delay/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Jerome Delay/AP

Congo Fighting Leaves A Fragile City On Edge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168345346/168367573" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kenyan Susan Oguya created an app to help farmers in her homeland. Shown here in the office of her company, M-Farm, she also belongs to the group Akirachix, which seeks to bring more Kenyan women into the tech world. Gregory Warner hide caption

toggle caption
Gregory Warner

Kenyan Women Create Their Own 'Geek Culture'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167961947/167987281" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

China Launches Media Campaign In Nairobi

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167600165/167600198" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Hospice Advocate Zelda Foster Has Died

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/5536172/5536173" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript