Gregory Warner Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation.
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Gregory Warner

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Gregory Warner 2017
Sandy Honig/NPR

Gregory Warner

Host, Rough Translation

Gregory Warner is the host of NPR's Rough Translation, a podcast about how things we're talking about in the United States are being talked about in some other part of the world. Whether interviewing a Ukrainian debunker of Russian fake news, a Japanese apology broker navigating different cultural meanings of the word "sorry," or a German dating coach helping a Syrian refugee find love, Warner's storytelling approach takes us out of our echo chambers and leads us to question the way we talk about the world. Rough Translation has received the Lowell Thomas Award from the Overseas Press Club and a Scripps Howard Award.

In his role as host, Warner draws on his own overseas experience. As NPR's East Africa correspondent, he covered the diverse issues and voices of a region that experienced unparalleled economic growth as well as a rising threat of global terrorism. Before joining NPR, he reported from conflict zones around the world as a freelancer. He climbed mountains with smugglers in Pakistan for This American Life, descended into illegal mineshafts in the Democratic Republic of Congo for Marketplace's "Working" series, and lugged his accordion across Afghanistan on the trail of the "Afghan Elvis" for Radiolab.

Warner has also worked as senior reporter for American Public Media's Marketplace, endeavoring to explain the economics of American health care. He's used puppets to illustrate the effects of Internet diagnostics on the doctor-patient relationship, and composed a Suessian poem to explain the correlation between health care job growth and national debt. His musical journey into the shadow world of medical coding won a Best News Feature award from the Third Coast International Audio Festival.

Warner has won a Peabody Award and awards from Edward R. Murrow, New York Festivals, AP, and PRNDI. He earned his degree in English from Yale University.

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Story Archive

A new French law requires masks be worn in certain public spaces, but it is still illegal to wear religious attire that covers the face. Halisia Hubbard/NPR hide caption

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Halisia Hubbard/NPR

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Amram and Gina Maman (second and third from left) with Aysha Abu Shhab (fourth from left) and other hotel patients. Aysha Abu Shhab hide caption

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Aysha Abu Shhab

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A green sweater that Jessie crocheted in China while waiting for Jacquie, her American surrogate, to deliver her baby. Jessie, Reproduced With Permission hide caption

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Jessie, Reproduced With Permission

"People who are stigmatized say they're made to feel that they are the disease themselves," said NPR correspondent Anthony Kuhn of some residents of South Korea, where the government publicizes personal data on COVID-19 carriers. Bernhard Lang/Getty Images hide caption

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Bernhard Lang/Getty Images

The Coronavirus Guilt Trip

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A resident talks on the phone while walking in Jiangtan park after its reopening in March in Wuhan, Hubei province, China. The new coronavirus pandemic felt thousands of miles away, until it didn't. As cases in the U.S. skyrocketed, many noticed a shift — from watching the headlines, to watching what we touch. Getty Images hide caption

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Getty Images

Is COVID-19 Changing How We Measure Distance?

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A gloved passenger holds her phone on a subway train in Wuhan in central China's Hubei province on March 28. Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images hide caption

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Feature China/Barcroft Media via Getty Images

WeChats From The Future

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To the left: an empty subway car in Beijing, China. To the right: a crowded park in Berlin, Germany. Amy Xiaomeng Cheng/NPR and Rob Schmitz/NPR hide caption

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Amy Xiaomeng Cheng/NPR and Rob Schmitz/NPR

How Covid-19 Is Challenging Cultures

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Chinese exchange Student Li Jiabao (李家宝 aka 李家寶). Li is seeking asylum in Taiwan after posting a video that went viral on Twitter criticizing the Chinese president and Communist Party. NPR's Emily Feng hide caption

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NPR's Emily Feng

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy exits the parliament after his swearing in on May 20 in Kiev, Ukraine. Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images hide caption

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Brendan Hoffman/Getty Images

'Rough Translation': A Check On The Corruption Fight In Ukraine

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A comedy team rehearses their sketch, at the Palace of Culture in Kramatorsk, Ukraine. Gregory Warner hide caption

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Gregory Warner

Whose Ukraine Is It Anyway?

Please, take our survey! At a Ukrainian comedy competition founded by President Volodymyr Zelensky, can humor unite a divided country?

Whose Ukraine Is It Anyway?

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A march through the streets of Kyiv. Gregory Warner hide caption

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Gregory Warner

Why There's A Divide Between Environmentalists And Evangelicals

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