Kat Chow Kat Chow is a reporter covering race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team.
Kat Chow at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley) (Square)
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Kat Chow

Allison Shelley/NPR
Kat Chow at NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., July 25, 2018. (photo by Allison Shelley)
Allison Shelley/NPR

Kat Chow

Reporter, Code Switch

Kat Chow is a reporter with NPR and a founding member of the Code Switch team. She is currently on sabbatical, working on her first book (forthcoming from Grand Central Publishing/Hachette). It's a memoir that digs into the questions about grief, race and identity that her mother's sudden death triggered when Kat was young.

For NPR, she's reported on what defines Native American identity, gentrification in New York City's Chinatown, and the aftermath of a violent hate crime. Her cultural criticism has led her on explorations of racial representation in TV, film, and theater; the post-election crisis that diversity trainers face; race and beauty standards; and gaslighting. She's an occasional fourth chair on Pop Culture Happy Hour, as well as a guest host on Slate's podcast The Waves. Her work has garnered her a national award from the Asian American Journalists Association, and she was an inaugural recipient of the Yi Dae Up fellowship at the Jack Jones Literary Arts Retreat. She has led master classes and spoken about her reporting in Amsterdam, Minneapolis, Valparaiso, Louisville, Boston and Seattle.

She's drawn to stories about race, gender and generational differences

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Story Archive

Ahhh, the joys of reading. Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images hide caption

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Gulfiya Mukhamatdinova/Getty Images

Code Switch's 2018 Book Guide

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Switched for Christmas, starring Candace Cameron Bure and Mark Deklin, is just one of many, many Hallmark Holiday movies with casts that look just like this. Jeremy Lee /Hallmark Channel hide caption

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Jeremy Lee /Hallmark Channel

'Tis The Season: We Talk Hallmark Holiday Movies

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Asian-American students applying to college are closely watching a lawsuit alleging that Harvard University discriminates against Asian-American students in admissions. Scott Eisen/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Eisen/Getty Images

As College Apps Are Due, Asian-American High Schoolers Consider Affirmative Action

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Noah Centineo and Lana Condor star in the Netflix adaptation of the young adult novel To All The Boys I've Loved Before. Netflix hide caption

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Netflix

Pop Culture Happy Hour: 'To All The Boys I've Loved Before'

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A Summer Camp For Sikh Youth

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Constance Wu and Henry Golding star in Crazy Rich Asians. Sanja Bucko/Warner Bros. hide caption

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Sanja Bucko/Warner Bros.

'Crazy Rich Asians' Is A Crazy Good Movie

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How Video Games Can Help Us Explore Ideas About Race

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Nailah Winkfield (left) and Omari Sealey, the mother and uncle of Jahi McMath, listen to doctors speak during a news conference in San Francisco in 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP