Kat Chow Kat Chow is a reporter covering race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team.
Ericka Cruz Guevarra/NPR
Kat Chow 2016
Ericka Cruz Guevarra/NPR

Kat Chow

Reporter, Code Switch

Kat Chow is a founding member of NPR's Code Switch, an award-winning team that covers the complicated stories of race, ethnicity, and culture. She helps make new episodes for the Code Switch podcast, reports online features for Code Switch, and reports on-air pieces for NPR's shows like Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Her work has led readers and listeners on explorations of the gendered and racialized double standards surrounding double-eyelid surgery, as well as the mysterious origins of a so-called "Oriental" riff – a word she's also written a personal essay about. Much of her role revolves around finding new ways to build communities and tell stories, like @todayin1963 or #xculturelove.

During her tenure at NPR, Chow has also worked with NPR's show Invisibilia to develop a new digital strategy; reported for KERA in Dallas, Texas, as NPR's 2015 radio reporting fellow; and served on the selection committee for AIR Media's incubator project, Localore. Every now and then, she's a fourth chair on NPR's podcast Pop Culture Happy Hour. And sometimes, people ask her to talk about the work she does — at conferences in Amsterdam or Chicago, or at member stations in St. Paul or Louisville.

While a student at the University of Washington in Seattle, Chow wrote a food column for the Seattle Weekly, interned with the Seattle Times and worked on NBC's Winter Olympics coverage in Vancouver, B.C. You can find her tweeting for Code Switch at @NPRCodeSwitch and sharing her thoughts at @katchow.

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Story Archive

How Video Games Can Help Us Explore Ideas About Race

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Nailah Winkfield (left) and Omari Sealey, the mother and uncle of Jahi McMath, listen to doctors speak during a news conference in San Francisco in 2014. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

The National Museum of the American Indian announced its winning design for the National Native American Veterans Memorial. National Museum of the American Indian hide caption

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National Museum of the American Indian

Smithsonian Reveals Winning Design For New Native American Veterans Memorial

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Walgreens has released a statement defending its pharmacist's right to decline to fill a prescription on ethical or religious grounds. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The white clapboard farmhouse where Laura Ingalls Wilder wrote many of the books in her Little House on the Prairie novels still stands in Mansfield, Mo. Mark Schiefelbein /AP hide caption

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Mark Schiefelbein /AP

Remembering Rev. Ralph David Abernathy 50 Years After Resurrection City Came Down

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Being in rural places means potential patients may often be isolated, low-income and not have easy access to transportation — and therefore difficult to serve. Christina Chung for NPR hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

In A Border Region Where Immigrants Are Wary, A Health Center Travels To Its Patients

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Tommie Smith and John Carlos, gold and bronze medalists in the 200-meter run at the 1968 Olympic Games, raise their fists to protest the inequity and discrimination that black people in the U.S. face. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images