Kat Chow Kat Chow is a reporter covering race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team.
Ericka Cruz Guevarra/NPR
Kat Chow 2016
Ericka Cruz Guevarra/NPR

Kat Chow

Reporter, Code Switch

Kat Chow is a founding member of NPR's Code Switch, an award-winning team that covers the complicated stories of race, ethnicity, and culture. She helps make new episodes for the Code Switch podcast, reports online features for Code Switch, and reports on-air pieces for NPR's shows like Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Her work has led readers and listeners on explorations of the gendered and racialized double standards surrounding double-eyelid surgery, as well as the mysterious origins of a so-called "Oriental" riff – a word she's also written a personal essay about. Much of her role revolves around finding new ways to build communities and tell stories, like @todayin1963 or #xculturelove.

During her tenure at NPR, Chow has also worked with NPR's show Invisibilia to develop a new digital strategy; reported for KERA in Dallas, Texas, as NPR's 2015 radio reporting fellow; and served on the selection committee for AIR Media's incubator project, Localore. Every now and then, she's a fourth chair on NPR's podcast Pop Culture Happy Hour. And sometimes, people ask her to talk about the work she does — at conferences in Amsterdam or Chicago, or at member stations in St. Paul or Louisville.

While a student at the University of Washington in Seattle, Chow wrote a food column for the Seattle Weekly, interned with the Seattle Times and worked on NBC's Winter Olympics coverage in Vancouver, B.C. You can find her tweeting for Code Switch at @NPRCodeSwitch and sharing her thoughts at @katchow.

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Story Archive

Being in rural places means potential patients may often be isolated, low-income and not have easy access to transportation — and therefore difficult to serve. Christina Chung for NPR hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

Tommie Smith and John Carlos, gold and bronze medalists in the 200-meter run at the 1968 Olympic Games, raise their fists to protest the inequity and discrimination that black people in the U.S. face. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Bettmann Archive/Getty Images

Gary Lum assists his daughter, Mei Lum, with decorating the storefront window at Wing on Wo & Co. for the Lunar New Year in the Chinatown neighborhood of New York City. The family imported the unique handmade lion-head dance costume from Hong Kong nearly 50 years ago. Annie Ling for NPR hide caption

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Annie Ling for NPR

Blood quantum was initially a system that the federal government placed onto tribes in an effort to limit their citizenship. Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images hide caption

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Leigh Wells/Getty Images/Ikon Images

So What Exactly Is 'Blood Quantum'?

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Ask Code Switch: Who Can Call Themselves 'Brown'?

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In the 1944 film Gaslight, Gregory (Charles Boyer) slowly tricks his wife, Paula (Ingrid Bergman), into believing she is insane. Bettmann Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Two Years After A Violent Altercation At A S.C. High School, Has Anything Changed?

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In the musical KPOP, Ashley Park plays the Korean pop star Mwe, one of the show's emotional centers. Ben Arons/Courtesy of KPOP hide caption

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Ben Arons/Courtesy of KPOP

A New Musical — And Its Audience — Grapple With Asian Identity, Through K-Pop

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For Floridians With Family In Cuba, Recovery From Irma Is Twice As Taxing

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Waynetta Lawrie (left), of Tulsa, Okla., stands with others at the state Capitol in Oklahoma City in 2007, during a demonstration by several Cherokee Freedmen and their supporters. AP hide caption

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AP

The past few weeks have revitalized debates across the country about what role Confederate monuments play in commemorating U.S. history. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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What Our Monuments (Don't) Teach Us About Remembering The Past

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