Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a correspondent for NPR reporting on the state of U.S. democracy, including the election process, voting rights and the census.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

His investigation into the decades-long campaign for a census citizenship question was honored by the Society of Professional Journalists with a Sigma Delta Chi Award. Wang also earned the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award and a National Headliner Award for his reporting on the 2020 census.

Story Archive

Tuesday

People wait in line to vote in Georgia's 2022 primary election in Atlanta. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

MANY US CITIZENS LACK VOTER ID

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Wednesday

Republican Sen. Bill Hagerty of Tennessee speaks about the Senate version of the Equal Representation Act during a January press conference in Washington, D.C. The bill is one of at least a dozen GOP proposals to exclude some or all non-U.S. citizens from a special census count that the 14th Amendment says must include the "whole number of persons in each state." Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

Republicans in Congress are trying to reshape election maps by excluding noncitizens

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Tuesday

Thursday

A voter braves a cold rain running to cast a ballot during the Spring election Tuesday, April 2, 2024, in Fox Point, Wisconsin. Morry Gash/AP hide caption

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Morry Gash/AP

Tuesday

Hilary Fung/NPR

Why there's a long-standing voter registration gap for Latinos and Asian Americans

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Friday

Checkboxes for race and ethnicity on government forms will include more choices

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Thursday

The Biden administration has approved proposals for the U.S. census and federal surveys to change how Latinos are asked about their race and ethnicity and to add a checkbox for "Middle Eastern or North African." RLT_Images/Getty Images hide caption

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RLT_Images/Getty Images

Next U.S. census will have new boxes for 'Middle Eastern or North African,' 'Latino'

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Wednesday

Friday

An election worker directs voters to a ballot drop-off location in 2020 in Portland, Ore. Oregon is among the states waiting for the Biden administration to greenlight plans to automatically register eligible voters when they apply to enroll in Medicaid. Nathan Howard/Getty Images hide caption

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Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Biden officials keep states waiting on expanding Medicaid voter registration

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Wednesday

Voters of color in Nassau County, N.Y., a segregated suburb of New York City, are waging an unprecedented redistricting fight under a state voting rights act, an emerging tool for protecting voting rights at the local level. Tracy J. Lee for NPR hide caption

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Tracy J. Lee for NPR

A voting rights battle in a New York City suburb may lead to a national fight

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Tuesday

The U.S. Census Bureau says it's no longer moving ahead with proposed changes to how an annual survey produces estimates of how many people with disabilities are living in the country. smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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smartboy10/Getty Images

Tuesday

Saturday

A participant in the annual Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Peace Walk in Washington, D.C., holds a sign that says "PROTECT VOTING RIGHTS" in 2022. Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images

Sunday

Legal challenges to the Voting Rights Act continue into the new year

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Monday

The U.S. Census Bureau has proposed changes to how its annual American Community Survey produces estimates of how many people with disabilities are living in the country. smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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A controversial Census Bureau proposal could shrink the U.S. disability rate by 40%

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Monday

Thursday

Wednesday

Cochise County Supervisors Tom Crosby and Peggy Judd face felony charges for refusing to meet Arizona's deadline for certifying 2022 election results. Alberto Mariani/AP; Mark Levy/Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Alberto Mariani/AP; Mark Levy/Pool Photo via AP

Monday

Tuesday

Monday

Demonstrators hold up large cut-out letters spelling "VOTING RIGHTS" at a 2021 rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

An appeals court has struck down a key path for enforcing the Voting Rights Act

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Saturday

A perimeter fence surrounds the U.S. Capitol in February ahead of President Biden's State of the Union speech in Washington, D.C. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

Many voters say Congress is broken. Could proportional representation fix it?

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Friday

Saturday

A recorded video message by then-President Donald Trump plays at a 2019 naturalization ceremony for new U.S. citizens at the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services field office in Miami. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

A GOP plan for the census would revive Trump's failed push for a citizenship question

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