Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York bureau. He covers the changing demographics of the U.S. and breaking news in the Northeast for NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, hourly newscasts, and NPR.org.

In 2016, his reporting after the church shooting in Charleston, S.C., won a Salute to Excellence National Media Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. He was also part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis' tour of the U.S. His profile of a white member of a Boston Chinatown gang won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association in 2014.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he's contributed to NPR's breaking news coverage of the Orlando nightclub shooting, protests in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray, and the trial of George Zimmerman in Florida.

Wang previously reported on race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team. He has also reported for Seattle public radio station KUOW and worked behind the scenes of NPR's Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

A Philadelphia native, Wang speaks both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects of Chinese. As a student at Swarthmore College, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly podcast on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Story Archive

The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to take up a sped-up review of a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has agreed to testify at a House oversight committee hearing in March about the citizenship question he approved adding to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

For the 2010 census, the Census Bureau director took a dog sled to complete his trip to Noorvik, Alaska. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Why The U.S. Census Starts In Alaska's Most Remote, Rural Villages

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross stands behind President Trump during a bill signing ceremony at the White House in 2018. Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Administration Must Remove Census Citizenship Question, Judge Rules

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Judge Orders Trump Administration To Remove 2020 Census Citizenship Question

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Nancy Pelosi of California (third from right), now House speaker, joins fellow Democrats, including Reps. José Serrano of New York and Elijah Cummings of Maryland, as well as other census advocates at a May 2018 press conference in Washington, D.C., about the new citizenship question on the 2020 census. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

The printing company R.R. Donnelley & Sons has been selected to print the 2020 census paper questionnaires. The company previously printed forms and envelopes for the 2010 census. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

President Trump's nominee for Census Bureau director, Steven Dillingham (center), speaks with Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wisc., at his Oct. 3 confirmation hearing before the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc./Getty Images

Two senior officials at the U.S. Government Publishing Office, based in Washington, D.C., betrayed "public trust" and eroded employee morale by hiring unqualified workers, including an official's son, the agency's Office of Inspector General said in an internal report. Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

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Eslah Attar/NPR

Cronyism, 'Wasteful' Spending Accusations Roil Government Publishing Office

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Sharon Sakamoto shows two family photos of Eileen Okada and her other older siblings, who spent part of their childhood living in a barrack behind barbed wire at an Idaho prison camp the U.S. government named the Minidoka War Relocation Center. The third photo is a portrait of their father, Roy Sakamoto, as a young boy. Jovelle Tamayo for NPR hide caption

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Jovelle Tamayo for NPR

Some Japanese-Americans Wrongfully Imprisoned During WWII Oppose Census Question

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Houses on the Navajo Nation sit near sandstone cliffs north of Many Farms, Ariz. New Census Bureau estimates show a low rate of high-speed internet access among Native Americans who live on tribal land. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens stand during a naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Census Bureau is planning to test how a question about U.S. citizenship status the Trump administration added will affect responses to the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on Feb. 19 about whether Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross can be deposed for the lawsuits over the citizenship question he added to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images