Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
Stephen Voss/NPR
Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York bureau. He covers the changing demographics of the U.S. and breaking news in the Northeast for NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, hourly newscasts, and NPR.org.

In 2016, his reporting after the church shooting in Charleston, S.C., won a Salute to Excellence National Media Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. He was also part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis' tour of the U.S. His profile of a white member of a Boston Chinatown gang won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association in 2014.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he's contributed to NPR's breaking news coverage of the Orlando nightclub shooting, protests in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray, and the trial of George Zimmerman in Florida.

Wang previously reported on race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team. He has also reported for Seattle public radio station KUOW and worked behind the scenes of NPR's Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

A Philadelphia native, Wang speaks both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects of Chinese. As a student at Swarthmore College, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly podcast on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Story Archive

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross prepares ahead of a Senate hearing on tariffs on June 20, in Washington, D.C. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Census Overseers Seeded DOJ's Request To Add Citizenship Question, Memo Shows

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, appears before the House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform to discuss the 2020 census, in Washington, D.C., in October 2017. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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Documents Shed Light On Decision To Add Census Citizenship Question

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Santa Fe, Texas, Shooting Takes Toll On Area's Chief Medical Examiner

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Texas Community Prays Together After Friday's School Shooting

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Santa Fe Community Mourns Those Killed In Texas School Shooting

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The Complicated History Of The U.S. Census Asking About Citizenship

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The U.S. government is conducting a test run of the 2020 census in Rhode Island's Providence County, where many noncitizens living in Central Falls, R.I., say they're planning to avoid participating in the national head count. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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Many Noncitizens Plan To Avoid The 2020 Census, Test Run Indicates

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John Gore, acting head of the Justice Department's civil rights division, (right) shakes hands with U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions in Washington, D.C., in April. Brendan Smialowski/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Trial Test Indicates Noncitizens Plan To Avoid 2020 Census

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The House Committee on Oversight and Government Reform's top Democrat, Rep. Elijah Cummings seen here in 2017, co-signed a letter requesting a subpoena for documents about the 2020 census citizenship question from the Census Bureau and Commerce Department, which oversees the census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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An envelope contains a test questionnaire for the 2020 census mailed to a resident in Providence, R.I., as part of the nation's only test run of the upcoming national headcount. A Trump administration plan to include a citizenship question on the 2020 census has prompted legal challenges from many Democratic-led states. Michelle R. Smith/AP hide caption

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Michelle R. Smith/AP

Signs sit behind the podium before the start of a press conference in New York City about the multi-state lawsuit to block the Trump administration from adding a question about citizenship to the 2020 census form. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman speaks at a news conference after a DACA hearing at a Brooklyn court on Jan. 30. New York state is leading a group of 17 states in a lawsuit to try to remove a new citizenship question from the 2020 census questionnaire. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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