Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR based in New York City. He reports on the people, power and money behind the 2020 census.

Wang received the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award for covering the Census Bureau and the Trump administration's push for a citizenship question.

His reporting has also earned awards from the Asian American Journalists Association, National Association of Black Journalists, and Native American Journalists Association.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he has reported on race and ethnicity for Code Switch and worked on Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

As a student at Swarthmore College, he worked on a weekly podcast about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Story Archive

People walk by a mural of George Floyd, whose murder by police in Minneapolis helped ignite worldwide support for the Black Lives Matter movement, in Gaza City, Gaza Strip, in June 2020. Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Majdi Fathi/NurPhoto via Getty Images

The Complicated History Behind BLM's Solidarity With The Pro-Palestinian Movement

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People holding umbrellas walk through New York City's Times Square in 2019. The U.S. Census Bureau plans to change how it protects the confidentiality of people's information in the detailed demographic data it produces through the 2020 count. Mary Altaffer/AP hide caption

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Mary Altaffer/AP

For The U.S. Census, Keeping Your Data Anonymous And Useful Is A Tricky Balance

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Minnesota's state demographer, Susan Brower (center), walks with Dean Goldberg, donning a blue cape and black mask as "Census Man," through the 2019 Minnesota State Fair in St. Paul, Minn., to encourage residents to participate in the national head count. Victor Thorstenson/Minnesota Department of Administration hide caption

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Victor Thorstenson/Minnesota Department of Administration

How 26 People In The Census Count Helped Minnesota Beat New York For A House Seat

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For Some States, Keeping Congress Seats Comes Down To The Wire

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Census: More Seats For Texas, Fewer For California and New York

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Political Ramifications Show Importance Of Filling Out Census Form

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After Months Of Delays, The 1st Census Results Are Here

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Some states have gained or lost Electoral College votes because of changes in population numbers recorded by the 2020 census. Zach Levitt/NPR hide caption

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Zach Levitt/NPR

Here's How The 1st 2020 Census Results Changed Electoral College, House Seats

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U.S. Army soldiers board a bus in January 2020 at Fort Bragg, N.C., one of the military bases that will likely see population boosts in their 2020 census counts due to a change to how troops deployed abroad were counted. Chris Seward/AP hide caption

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Chris Seward/AP

Why Deployed Troop Counts Are A 'Wildcard' In 2020 Census Results

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Change To Census Military Counts Could Shift House Seats, Electoral College

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If passed, two new bills in Congress would extend the reporting deadlines for 2020 census results, which are now months overdue after the pandemic and interference by Trump administration officials upended last year's national count. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (right) speaks outside the U.S. Capitol in March with other members of the U.S. House of Representatives, the size of which has stayed at 435 voting members for decades. Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP via Getty Images

Stuck At 435 Representatives? Why The U.S. House Hasn't Grown With Census Counts

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