Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.
Hansi Lo Wang - Square
Stories By

Hansi Lo Wang

A controversial legal theory about the power state legislatures have over federal election rules has been backed by the conservative Honest Elections Project, which has filed multiple U.S. Supreme Court briefs on the topic, including one for a 2020 case about mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Slocum/AP

This conservative group helped push a disputed election theory

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1111606448/1117762280" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A voter drops off his mail ballot for the 2022 Pennsylvania primary elections in Newtown Square, Pa., on May 2. The state's Supreme Court has ruled in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a state law that expanded mail-in voting. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Rourke/AP

The House oversight committee has released internal documents about the failed push for a census citizenship question by former President Donald Trump's administration, including Wilbur Ross, the former commerce secretary who is shown at a White House meeting in 2018. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Brandon/AP

Documents detail the secret strategy behind Trump's census citizenship question push

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1044944618/1112579686" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., the current chair of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, who's shown here in 2018, has introduced a bill to try to protect the 2030 census and other future head counts from political interference. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Andrew Harnik/AP

A Supreme Court decision could radically reshape presidential elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1110778838/1110778839" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Supreme Court could radically reshape elections for president and Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1109275691/1109275692" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Voters line up to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election in Durham, N.C. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a North Carolina redistricting case this fall about how much power state legislatures have over how federal elections are run. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerry Broome/AP

How the Supreme Court could radically reshape elections for president and Congress

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1107648753/1109051883" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A voter presents identification at a polling site for the 2020 elections in New Orleans. The U.S. Supreme Court has temporarily blocked a lower court's order for the creation of a second majority Black congressional district in the state. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Gerald Herbert/AP

Volunteers take part in a 2004 voter outreach event in Dearborn, Mich., organized by the Arab American Institute. While there is no federal requirement for Arabic-language ballots, the city of Dearborn recently started requiring election materials to be translated into Arabic. Bill Pugliano/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bill Pugliano/Getty Images

A federal law requires translated voting ballots, but not in Arabic or Haitian Creole

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1083848846/1108843871" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Biden administration is starting a process that could change how the U.S. census and federal surveys ask about people's racial and ethnic identities by 2024. RLT_Images/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
RLT_Images/Getty Images

Election worker Monica Ging processes a ballot for Pennsylvania's primaries in May at the Chester County Voter Services office in West Chester, Pa. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Slocum/AP

How undated ballots could affect Pennsylvania's GOP Senate race and voters' rights

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1101779681/1102097141" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Election workers in Pennsylvania's Chester County review mail-in and absentee ballots for the 2020 general election in West Chester, Pa. A number of Republican state lawmakers who helped pass a law that expanded mail-in voting are now suing to get it thrown out. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Matt Slocum/AP

A mail-in voting law is under attack by Pennsylvania GOP lawmakers who passed it

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1096943765/1099244648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Census Bureau worker waits to gather information from people during a 2020 census promotional event in New York City. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan McDermid/Reuters

The 2020 census had big undercounts of Black people, Latinos and Native Americans

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1083732104/1085838513" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators hold signs saying "Count Me In" outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2019, when the court blocked former President Donald Trump's administration from adding a citizenship question to 2020 census forms. Carlos Barria/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Carlos Barria/Reuters