Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

Amid Census Concerns, Religious Leaders Asked To Quell Fears

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Top: Keziah Therchik (left) and Angel Charles take a selfie before performing Yup'ik dancing in Toksook Bay. Left: Dora Nicholai (in pink) dances at a community center, where portraits of the community's elders hang on a wall. Right: Women show Yup'ik dance fans. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham appears at a 2020 census event in April 2019. He says despite concerns, the bureau is on track to carry out the first primarily online U.S. census with enough workers. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Government Report Says Census Bureau Is Behind On Staffing Up And Cybersecurity

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People inquire about temporary positions available for the 2020 census during a job fair in Miami in September 2019. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Lawmakers, Advocates Worry Bureau Won't Fill Half-Million 2020 Census Jobs

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Rising temperatures in Alaska are melting permafrost, widening rivers and eroding homes in the remote village of Newtok, where about a third of residents relocated to higher ground last year. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Climate Change Complicates Counting Some Alaska Native Villages For Census

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Climate Change Threatens Alaska Census Count

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The Census Bureau Is Looking For A Few (500,000) Good Temps

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Steven Dillingham (right), the Census Bureau's director, walks through Toksook Bay, Alaska, on Tuesday and went to count the first person for the census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Along The Rim of Alaska, The Once-A-Decade U.S. Census Began In Toksook Bay

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Robert Bozick (right), a demographer at the RAND Corporation, and Beverly Weidmer, a survey director, review maps of a neighborhood selected to be included in the California Neighborhoods Count at the think tank's headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Outspending Every Other State On The Census, California Starts Its Own Count Too

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The Private Files Of Thomas Hofeller, GOP Redistricting Operative, Are Now Public

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Stephanie Hofeller stands with her father, Thomas, for a family photo in California during the 1970s. Republicans fought to stop computer files found on the redistricting expert's hard drives from going public — now Stephanie is sharing them online. Courtesy of Stephanie Hofeller hide caption

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Courtesy of Stephanie Hofeller

A newly sworn-in U.S. citizen holds the U.S. flag and paperwork during a 2018 naturalization ceremony in New York City. The Department of Homeland Security has agreed to share its records with the U.S. Census Bureau to help produce data about the U.S. citizenship status of every person living in the country, as ordered by President Trump. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Prisoners pass through a courtyard at Waupun Correctional Institution. Officials in some prison towns have come up with creative ways to avoid forming voting districts made up primarily of prisoners. But in many others, political lines are drawn around prisons in a way that critics deride as "prison gerrymandering." Lauren Justice for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Justice for NPR

'Your Body Being Used': Where Prisoners Who Can't Vote Fill Voting Districts

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Demonstrators against the Trump administration's push to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP