Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York bureau. He covers the changing demographics of the U.S. and breaking news in the Northeast for NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, hourly newscasts, and NPR.org.

In 2016, his reporting after the church shooting in Charleston, S.C., won a Salute to Excellence National Media Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. He was also part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis' tour of the U.S. His profile of a white member of a Boston Chinatown gang won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association in 2014.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he's contributed to NPR's breaking news coverage of the Orlando nightclub shooting, protests in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray, and the trial of George Zimmerman in Florida.

Wang previously reported on race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team. He has also reported for Seattle public radio station KUOW and worked behind the scenes of NPR's Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

A Philadelphia native, Wang speaks both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects of Chinese. As a student at Swarthmore College, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly podcast on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Story Archive

New citizens stand for the U.S. national anthem at a naturalization ceremony in Jackson, Miss., in September 2017. The Census Bureau is considering adding a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Rogelio V. Solis/AP hide caption

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Rogelio V. Solis/AP

The further away people with Hispanic ancestry are from their immigrant roots, the less likely they are to identify as Hispanic or Latino, a new Pew Research Center study finds. Pew Research Center hide caption

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Pew Research Center

Latino Identity Fades As Immigrant Ties Weaken, Study Finds

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The Rash Of Troubles At The Census Bureau

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A demonstrator carries a sign that says "More than 300,000 Negroes are Denied Vote in Ala" to protest then-Alabama Gov. George Wallace's visit to Indianapolis in 1964. The word "Negro" was widely used to describe black people in the U.S. during the early civil rights era. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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The 2010 census form included separate questions about race and Hispanic origin. The White House has yet to announce its decision on a proposal that would allow race and ethnicity to be asked in a single, combined question on the 2020 census. Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul J. Richards/AFP/Getty Images

If the White House approves a proposal to change the way the government collects race and ethnicity data, white people in the U.S. may be asked to check off boxes about their ethnic background. On this 2010 census form, answering "white" was enough to respond to the race question. blackwaterimages/Getty Images hide caption

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The Trump administration is considering possible changes to how the U.S. government collects information about race and ethnicity. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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How The U.S. Defines Race And Ethnicity May Change Under Trump

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A House's Flood History Can Be Hard To Find

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Corey Boyer, a real estate investor, inspects the kitchen of a house flooded after Hurricane Harvey in Humble, Texas. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Real Estate Investors Rush To Buy Houston Homes Damaged By Flooding

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News Brief: Trump's Asia Trip, New York City Marathon

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New York City Prepares For Massive Marathon In Wake Of Terror Attack

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