Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

His investigation into the decades-long campaign for a census citizenship question was honored by the Society of Professional Journalists with a Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Wang's coverage of the Trump administration's failed push for the question earned him the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He has also received a National Headliner Award for his reporting from the remote village in Alaska where the 2020 count officially began.

Story Archive

A voter passes large signs spelling out "Vote Here" in Minneapolis in September 2016. Voters in Minnesota can start casting their ballots for this year's midterm elections on Friday. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Stop thinking just about Election Day. We're in voting season now

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Balloons decorate a 2019 event leading up to the 2020 census in Boston. The U.S. House has passed a bill that could help protect the 2030 census and other future counts from political interference. Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

A worker with the Detroit Department of Elections takes a break after sorting through absentee ballots at the Central Counting Board in the TCF Center on November 4, 2020 in Detroit, Michigan. Elaine Cromie/Getty Images hide caption

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Elaine Cromie/Getty Images

Layi Oniwinde, 16, fills out an election worker application as his mother, Adaobi Oniwinde, looks on with a smile in Wheaton, Md. "I love the way the system here allows everybody to be involved," says Adaobi about the U.S. election system. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR

The midterm elections need workers. Teens, veterans and lawyers are stepping up

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A controversial legal theory about the power state legislatures have over federal election rules has been backed by the conservative Honest Elections Project, which has filed multiple U.S. Supreme Court briefs on the topic, including one for a 2020 case about mail-in ballots in Pennsylvania. Matt Slocum/AP hide caption

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Matt Slocum/AP

This conservative group helped push a disputed election theory

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A voter drops off his mail ballot for the 2022 Pennsylvania primary elections in Newtown Square, Pa., on May 2. The state's Supreme Court has ruled in a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of a state law that expanded mail-in voting. Matt Rourke/AP hide caption

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Matt Rourke/AP

The House oversight committee has released internal documents about the failed push for a census citizenship question by former President Donald Trump's administration, including Wilbur Ross, the former commerce secretary who is shown at a White House meeting in 2018. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Documents detail the secret strategy behind Trump's census citizenship question push

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Rep. Carolyn Maloney, D-N.Y., the current chair of the House Oversight and Reform Committee, who's shown here in 2018, has introduced a bill to try to protect the 2030 census and other future head counts from political interference. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A Supreme Court decision could radically reshape presidential elections

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The Supreme Court could radically reshape elections for president and Congress

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Voters line up to cast their ballots in the 2020 presidential election in Durham, N.C. The U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear a North Carolina redistricting case this fall about how much power state legislatures have over how federal elections are run. Gerry Broome/AP hide caption

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Gerry Broome/AP

How the Supreme Court could radically reshape elections for president and Congress

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A voter presents identification at a polling site for the 2020 elections in New Orleans. The U.S. Supreme Court has temporarily blocked a lower court's order for the creation of a second majority Black congressional district in the state. Gerald Herbert/AP hide caption

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Gerald Herbert/AP