Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

His investigation into the decades-long campaign for a census citizenship question was honored by the Society of Professional Journalists with a Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Wang's coverage of the Trump administration's failed push for the question earned him the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He has also received a National Headliner Award for his reporting from the remote village in Alaska where the 2020 count officially began.

Story Archive

Thursday

New proposals by the Biden administration would change how the U.S. census and federal surveys ask Latinos about their race and ethnicity and add a checkbox for "Middle Eastern or North African" to those forms. RussellCreative/Getty Images hide caption

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RussellCreative/Getty Images

New 'Latino' and 'Middle Eastern or North African' checkboxes proposed for U.S. forms

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Sunday

A sign held up by a demonstrator says "MOORE V. HARPER: A WEAPON TO OVERTURN ELECTIONS" at a December rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C. Mariam Zuhaib/AP hide caption

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Mariam Zuhaib/AP

The Supreme Court is weighing a theory that could upend elections. Here's how

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Monday

The U.S. census logo appears on census materials received in the mail with an invitation to fill out census information online in 2020 in San Anselmo, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Push To Redefine 'Black' And End Anti-Racist Voter Protections

In this episode of Code Switch, NPR's Hansi Lo Wang reports on the effort by Republican officials in Louisiana to change how Black people are counted in voting maps. If their plan is successful, it could shrink the power of Black voters across the country — and further gut the Voting Rights Act.

The Push To Redefine 'Black' And End Anti-Racist Voter Protections

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Friday

A demonstrator holds a sign that reads "Count Me In" outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2019. Sen. Brian Schatz, D-Hawaii, has introduced companion legislation to a House bill that could help prevent political interference with future head counts. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

A divided Congress may sideline protecting the census after Trump's interference

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Wednesday

Republican state officials in Louisiana are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on which voters should be categorized as Black when testing whether a map of election districts dilutes the political power of Black voters. Smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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Why some Republicans want to narrow who counts as Black

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Tuesday

Boxes of scanned ballots sit on a pallet at the Maricopa County Tabulation and Election Center on November 09, 2022 in Phoenix, Arizona. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

Monday

Arizona is set to finally make its election results official today

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Thursday

A man walks out after casting his vote on Election Day 2020 in Tombstone, Ariz., in Cochise County. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

Monday

People wait in line to vote on Election Day 2020 in Tombstone, Ariz., in Cochise County. The county's Republican-led leadership has voted to delay certifying its 2022 election results, despite a state deadline on Monday. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

Counties in Arizona, Pennsylvania fail to certify election results by legal deadlines

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Monday

Election workers sort ballots at the Maricopa County Ballot Tabulation Center last week in Phoenix. The election is not considered over until the vote totals are reviewed and certified. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Tuesday

Mail-in ballots sit in a secure area of the Allegheny County Election Division warehouse in Pittsburgh on Nov. 3. Pennsylvania state law does not allow election officials to start processing mail ballots for counting until 7 a.m. ET on Election Day. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Why mail voting laws may slow the count in some key swing states

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Saturday

Election workers scan mailed ballots at the Allegheny County Election Division warehouse in Pittsburgh on Nov. 3. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ordered local officials to hold off on counting ballots that arrive on time in envelopes without handwritten dates or with incorrect dates. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP