Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, Washington Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a correspondent for NPR reporting on voting.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

His investigation into the decades-long campaign for a census citizenship question was honored by the Society of Professional Journalists with a Sigma Delta Chi Award.

Wang's coverage of the Trump administration's failed push for the question earned him the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He has also received a National Headliner Award for his reporting from the remote village in Alaska where the 2020 count officially began.

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A man walks out after casting his vote on Election Day 2020 in Tombstone, Ariz., in Cochise County. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

People wait in line to vote on Election Day 2020 in Tombstone, Ariz., in Cochise County. The county's Republican-led leadership has voted to delay certifying its 2022 election results, despite a state deadline on Monday. Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Ariana Drehsler/AFP via Getty Images

Counties in Arizona, Pennsylvania fail to certify election results by legal deadlines

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Election workers sort ballots at the Maricopa County Ballot Tabulation Center last week in Phoenix. The election is not considered over until the vote totals are reviewed and certified. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Mail-in ballots sit in a secure area of the Allegheny County Election Division warehouse in Pittsburgh on Nov. 3. Pennsylvania state law does not allow election officials to start processing mail ballots for counting until 7 a.m. ET on Election Day. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Why mail voting laws may slow the count in some key swing states

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Election workers scan mailed ballots at the Allegheny County Election Division warehouse in Pittsburgh on Nov. 3. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court has ordered local officials to hold off on counting ballots that arrive on time in envelopes without handwritten dates or with incorrect dates. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

A disputed document by one of the delegates at the Constitutional Convention of 1787, depicted here in a painting by Thomas Rossiter, has been cited in a Supreme Court case about a once-fringe legal theory that could reshape federal elections. DEA Picture Library/De Agostini via Getty Images hide caption

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DEA Picture Library/De Agostini via Getty Images

Republican state officials in Louisiana are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to weigh in on which voters should be categorized as Black when testing whether a map of election districts dilutes the political power of Black voters. Smartboy10/Getty Images hide caption

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Smartboy10/Getty Images

Who counts as Black in voting maps? Some GOP state officials want that narrowed

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A voter passes large signs spelling out "Vote Here" in Minneapolis in September 2016. Voters in Minnesota can start casting their ballots for this year's midterm elections on Friday. Jim Mone/AP hide caption

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Jim Mone/AP

Stop thinking just about Election Day. We're in voting season now

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Balloons decorate a 2019 event leading up to the 2020 census in Boston. The U.S. House has passed a bill that could help protect the 2030 census and other future counts from political interference. Brian Snyder/Reuters hide caption

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Brian Snyder/Reuters

A worker with the Detroit Department of Elections takes a break after sorting through absentee ballots at the Central Counting Board in the TCF Center on November 4, 2020 in Detroit, Michigan. Elaine Cromie/Getty Images hide caption

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Elaine Cromie/Getty Images

Layi Oniwinde, 16, fills out an election worker application as his mother, Adaobi Oniwinde, looks on with a smile in Wheaton, Md. "I love the way the system here allows everybody to be involved," says Adaobi about the U.S. election system. Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR hide caption

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Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for NPR

The midterm elections need workers. Teens, veterans and lawyers are stepping up

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