Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
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Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR reporting on the people, power and money behind the U.S. census.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

Wang's coverage of the administration's failed push for a census citizenship question earned him the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He received a National Headliner Award for his reporting from the remote village in Alaska where the 2020 count officially began.

Story Archive

A newly released Census Bureau email written during former President Donald Trump's administration — when Wilbur Ross, shown at a 2020 congressional hearing in Washington, D.C., served as the commerce secretary overseeing the census — details how officials interfered with the national head count. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Family of 5, including 3 children, among the victims of the deadly NYC apartment fire

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People gather Tuesday evening for a candlelight vigil outside the Bronx apartment building which was the scene of the city's deadliest fire in decades. Yuki Iwamura/AP hide caption

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Yuki Iwamura/AP

Many of those who died in the Bronx apartment fire were from West Africa

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A person holds a flyer explaining the benefits of participating in the census during a 2020 town hall in East Elmhurst, N.Y. Andrew Kelly/Reuters hide caption

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Andrew Kelly/Reuters

Challenging census results could mean more federal money for your community

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The omicron surge is making it hard to staff stores and restaurants. Some are closing

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Long lines are forming outside New York City's COVID testing sites

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Rina Torchinsky and Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

The federal agency that measures racial diversity is led mostly by white people

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After former President Donald Trump signed a presidential memo in August 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau was directed to stop collecting payroll taxes from certain employees in the final months of last year. The bureau is now trying to get some former temporary workers to pay what they owe. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Robert Santos, president of the American Statistical Association, has been approved to lead the U.S. Census Bureau as its new Senate-confirmed director through 2026. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Dancers perform during a promotional event for the U.S. census in New York City's Times Square in September 2020. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

An artistic portrayal of the changing demographics of the United States. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

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LA Johnson/NPR