Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York bureau. He covers the changing demographics of the U.S. and breaking news in the Northeast for NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, hourly newscasts, and NPR.org.

In 2016, his reporting after the church shooting in Charleston, S.C., won a Salute to Excellence National Media Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. He was also part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis' tour of the U.S. His profile of a white member of a Boston Chinatown gang won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association in 2014.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he's contributed to NPR's breaking news coverage of the Orlando nightclub shooting, protests in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray, and the trial of George Zimmerman in Florida.

Wang previously reported on race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team. He has also reported for Seattle public radio station KUOW and worked behind the scenes of NPR's Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

A Philadelphia native, Wang speaks both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects of Chinese. As a student at Swarthmore College, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly podcast on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Story Archive

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Then-candidate Donald Trump holds an LGBT rainbow flag during an October 2016 presidential campaign rally at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Colo. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) speaks with former FBI Director James Comey (center) and other officials at the Department of Justice in April 2017, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va., in August. A potential trial over a new 2020 census citizenship question is set to start on Nov. 5 in New York City. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

In newly unredacted emails, Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and a key Commerce official discussed preparing for his decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census to "go to the Supreme Court." J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (center) listens as President Trump speaks during a meeting at the White House in August. Ross, who oversees the census, approved adding a hotly contested question to the 2020 census that asks, "Is this person a citizen of the United States?" Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (left) and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the city and county of Los Angeles, plus four other cities, were joining California's lawsuit over the 2020 census citizenship question in May. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (center) announces that Stockton, Calif., and the city and county of Los Angeles are joining California's lawsuit over the 2020 census citizenship question at a news conference in Los Angeles in May. Becerra is joined by (from left) Los Angeles County Supervisor Hilda Solis, City Attorney Mike Feuer, Mayor Eric Garcetti and Stockton Mayor Michael Tubbs. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

Officials at the U.S. Government Publishing Office, headquartered in Washington, D.C., showed a "high degree of disregard" for procedures in awarding the 2020 census contract to the bankrupt printing company Cenveo, the agency's Office of the Inspector General found. Samantha Clark/NPR hide caption

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Samantha Clark/NPR

Officials Botched 2020 Census Printing Contract, Report Finds

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Marchers carry an LGBTQ pride flag during the Utah Pride Parade in Salt Lake City in June. The Senate bill would require the Census Bureau to protect all sexual orientation and gender identity information it collects. Rick Bowmer/AP hide caption

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Rick Bowmer/AP