Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York bureau. He covers the changing demographics of the U.S. and breaking news in the Northeast for NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, hourly newscasts, and NPR.org.

In 2016, his reporting after the church shooting in Charleston, S.C., won a Salute to Excellence National Media Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. He was also part of NPR's award-winning coverage of Pope Francis' tour of the U.S. His profile of a white member of a Boston Chinatown gang won a National Journalism Award from the Asian American Journalists Association in 2014.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he's contributed to NPR's breaking news coverage of the Orlando nightclub shooting, protests in Baltimore after the death of Freddie Gray, and the trial of George Zimmerman in Florida.

Wang previously reported on race, ethnicity, and culture for NPR's Code Switch team. He has also reported for Seattle public radio station KUOW and worked behind the scenes of NPR's Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

A Philadelphia native, Wang speaks both Mandarin and Cantonese dialects of Chinese. As a student at Swarthmore College, he hosted, produced, and reported for a weekly podcast on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Story Archive

Houses on the Navajo Nation sit near sandstone cliffs north of Many Farms, Ariz. New Census Bureau estimates show a low rate of high-speed internet access among Native Americans who live on tribal land. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

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David McNew/Getty Images

Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens stand during a naturalization ceremony in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Census Bureau is planning to test how a question about U.S. citizenship status the Trump administration added will affect responses to the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

The U.S. Supreme Court is set to hear oral arguments on Feb. 19 about whether Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross can be deposed for the lawsuits over the citizenship question he added to the 2020 census. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

(From left) Daniela Lebron, 18; Jennifer Lopez, 17; Klea Kalia, 21; and Yasmin Butt, 21, attend an event at Barnard College in New York City for Latino, first-generation and low-income students interested in studying abroad. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Generation Z Is The Most Racially And Ethnically Diverse Yet

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross listens to President Trump at the White House in March. Ross' decision to add a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want the question removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How The 2020 Census Citizenship Question Ended Up In Court

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Trump administration is planning to include a question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross arrives at a U.S. Senate hearing in June. He added a citizenship question to the 2020 census that has sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want it removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) and Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore (right) attend an April event at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. Gore reportedly has testified that Sessions directed the DOJ not to discuss alternatives to the 2020 census citizenship question with the Census Bureau. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Suspicious Packages Investigation Continues After The Discovery Of 3 More

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Two More Suspicious Packages Sent To Robert De Niro And Joe Biden

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Supreme Court Temporarily Blocks Questioning Of Ross In Census Lawsuits

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