Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent for NPR based in New York City. He reports on the people, power and money behind the 2020 census.

Wang received the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award for covering the Census Bureau and the Trump administration's push for a citizenship question.

His reporting has also earned awards from the Asian American Journalists Association, National Association of Black Journalists, and Native American Journalists Association.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he has reported on race and ethnicity for Code Switch and worked on Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

As a student at Swarthmore College, he worked on a weekly podcast about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Anthony Hill, Fair Count's communications associate, posts signs encouraging people to use the free Wi-Fi and apply for 2020 census jobs at ARC Community Center in Fort Gaines, Ga. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Setting Up Free Internet Around Georgia Ahead Of Primarily Online 2020 Census

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President Trump and U.S. Attorney General William Barr announce the Trump administration's decision to back down from its push for a citizenship question in the White House Rose Garden in July. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Nebraska Department of Motor Vehicles Director Rhonda Lahm has signed an agreement with the U.S. Census Bureau to share the state's driver's license records. The bureau is planning to use the records as part of an effort to produce data about the citizenship status of every person living in the U.S. Anna Gronewold/AP hide caption

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Anna Gronewold/AP

The Census Is Going Digital, Bringing The Threat Of Disinformation Campaigns

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GOP strategist Thomas Hofeller had concluded in a 2015 study that adding a citizenship question would help redraw state and local voting districts in a way that would be "advantageous to Republicans and Non-Hispanic Whites." C-SPAN via AP hide caption

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C-SPAN via AP

Lawmakers and civil rights groups are pressuring tech companies to come up with detailed policies about how to combat potential misinformation and disinformation about the 2020 census. Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Denis Charlet/AFP via Getty Images

Blocked Citizenship Question Not Likely To Lower Census Response, Bureau Says

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Demonstrators rally in Washington, D.C., in April to protest the Trump administration's efforts to add to 2020 census forms a citizenship question, which has since been blocked by the courts. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Tim Olson, the Census Bureau's associate director for field operations, says the bureau is trying to recruit job applicants who speak the languages of the neighborhoods where 2020 census workers will be collecting information. Amr Alfiky/NPR hide caption

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Amr Alfiky/NPR

Census Bureau partnership specialist Zakera Ahmed (left) and Jeff Behler, a regional director with the bureau, share information about the 2020 census at an elementary school in Corona, N.Y., in July. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

A Half Million 2020 Census Jobs: Will They Be Filled In Time?

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Census Bureau Struggles To Add Staff For 2020's Census

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The Census Bureau is turning to existing government records, such as state driver's licenses, to produce data about the U.S. citizenship status of every person living in the country. George Frey/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Attorney General William Barr (center) speaks during a July press conference on citizenship data with President Trump and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images