Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent for NPR based in New York City. He reports on the people, power and money behind the 2020 census.

Wang received the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award for covering the Census Bureau and the Trump administration's push for a citizenship question.

His reporting has also earned awards from the Asian American Journalists Association, National Association of Black Journalists, and Native American Journalists Association.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he has reported on race and ethnicity for Code Switch and worked on Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

As a student at Swarthmore College, he worked on a weekly podcast about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Story Archive

Steven Dillingham (right), the Census Bureau's director, walks through Toksook Bay, Alaska, on Tuesday and went to count the first person for the census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Along The Rim of Alaska, The Once-A-Decade U.S. Census Began In Toksook Bay

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Robert Bozick (right), a demographer at the RAND Corporation, and Beverly Weidmer, a survey director, review maps of a neighborhood selected to be included in the California Neighborhoods Count at the think tank's headquarters in Santa Monica, Calif. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Outspending Every Other State On The Census, California Starts Its Own Count Too

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The Private Files Of Thomas Hofeller, GOP Redistricting Operative, Are Now Public

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Stephanie Hofeller stands with her father, Thomas, for a family photo in California during the 1970s. Republicans fought to stop computer files found on the redistricting expert's hard drives from going public — now Stephanie is sharing them online. Courtesy of Stephanie Hofeller hide caption

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Courtesy of Stephanie Hofeller

A newly sworn-in U.S. citizen holds the U.S. flag and paperwork during a 2018 naturalization ceremony in New York City. The Department of Homeland Security has agreed to share its records with the U.S. Census Bureau to help produce data about the U.S. citizenship status of every person living in the country, as ordered by President Trump. Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP via Getty Images

Prisoners pass through a courtyard at Waupun Correctional Institution. Officials in some prison towns have come up with creative ways to avoid forming voting districts made up primarily of prisoners. But in many others, political lines are drawn around prisons in a way that critics deride as "prison gerrymandering." Lauren Justice for NPR hide caption

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Lauren Justice for NPR

'Your Body Being Used': Where Prisoners Who Can't Vote Fill Voting Districts

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Demonstrators against the Trump administration's push to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census rally outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Stabbing Suspect Is In Custody After Attack In New York Rabbi's Home

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Suspect Charged In Stabbing Attack At Rabbi's New York Home

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Encore: Chinese And Taiwanese Restaurants In U.S. Embrace Heritage In Their Names

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before the House Financial Services Committee in October. Under pressure from lawmakers and civil rights groups, the company has updated its policies to address census interference. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Anthony Hill, Fair Count's communications associate, posts signs encouraging people to use the free Wi-Fi and apply for 2020 census jobs at ARC Community Center in Fort Gaines, Ga. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Setting Up Free Internet Around Georgia Ahead Of Primarily Online 2020 Census

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President Trump and U.S. Attorney General William Barr announce the Trump administration's decision to back down from its push for a citizenship question in the White House Rose Garden in July. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images