Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
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Hansi Lo Wang

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Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR based in New York City. He reports on the people, power and money behind the 2020 census.

Wang received the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award for covering the Census Bureau and the Trump administration's push for a citizenship question.

His reporting has also earned awards from the Asian American Journalists Association, National Association of Black Journalists, and Native American Journalists Association.

Since joining NPR in 2010 as a Kroc Fellow, he has reported on race and ethnicity for Code Switch and worked on Weekend Edition as a production assistant.

As a student at Swarthmore College, he worked on a weekly podcast about the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

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Legal fights over the use of census data brought protesters to the Supreme Court in 2019. Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images hide caption

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Sarah L. Voisin/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Protesters hold signs at a rally about the 2020 census in front of the U.S. Supreme Court in 2019. President-elect Joe Biden has revoked the Trump administration's policy of excluding unauthorized immigrants from population numbers used to reallocate congressional seats and Electoral College votes. Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, a Trump appointee who wore a "2020 Census" mask while swearing in to testify before a congressional hearing last year, is set to leave on Jan. 20, months before his term ends on Dec. 31. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

A demonstrator holds a sign about the U.S. census outside the Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2019. The Census Bureau has stopped all work on President Trump's directive to produce a count of unauthorized immigrants that could be subtracted from a key set of census numbers, NPR has learned. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Census Bureau Stops Work On Trump's Request For Unauthorized Immigrant Count

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U.S. Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham, a Trump appointee, wants employees at the bureau to make producing a data report about noncitizens "a number one priority" in the final days of the Trump administration, the Commerce Department Office of Inspector General says. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

Rhode Island Gov. Gina Raimondo was named Thursday as President-elect Joe Biden's intended nominee for secretary of the U.S. Commerce Department, which oversees the Census Bureau. Jonathan Wiggs/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Wiggs/Boston Globe via Getty Images

A demonstrator hands out a sign about the 2020 census outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in 2019. The Census Bureau is projecting the first set of census numbers won't be ready until February, Trump administration attorneys told a federal judge on Monday. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Census Bureau Director Steven Dillingham holds up his mask with the words "2020 Census" as he testifies before a House Committee on Oversight and Reform hearing on the census in July. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Census Missed Year-End Deadline For Delivering Numbers For House Seats

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A Delay In Census Results Would Hinder States' Redistricting Efforts

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Protesters carrying signs about the census gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court in 2019. Immigrant rights advocates have vowed to continue fighting President Trump's proposal. Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Supreme Court Punts Census Case, Giving Trump An Iffy Chance To Alter Numbers

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Chris Worrell jokes with Teresa Jefferson while applying for a 2020 census job in Boston in February before the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on government records, the Census Bureau estimates the U.S. population has grown by as much as 8.7% since 2010. Blake Nissen/The Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Blake Nissen/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

Signs promoting the 2020 census hang on a fence in Reading, Pa., in September. The Census Bureau has found irregularities in this year's census responses that could affect the counting of millions of people. Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images hide caption

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Ben Hasty/MediaNews Group/Reading Eagle via Getty Images

Leaked documents show there's a possibility that the Census Bureau will not be able to produce numbers for congressional apportionment in time for President Trump to exclude unauthorized immigrants from the count before leaving office. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP