Hansi Lo Wang Hansi Lo Wang is a national correspondent based at NPR's New York Bureau.
Hansi Lo Wang - Square
Stories By

Hansi Lo Wang

Stephen Voss/NPR
Hansi Lo Wang - 2014
Stephen Voss/NPR

Hansi Lo Wang

Correspondent, National Desk

Hansi Lo Wang (he/him) is a national correspondent for NPR reporting on the people, power and money behind the U.S. census.

Wang was the first journalist to uncover plans by former President Donald Trump's administration to end 2020 census counting early.

Wang's coverage of the administration's failed push for a census citizenship question earned him the American Statistical Association's Excellence in Statistical Reporting Award. He received a National Headliner Award for his reporting from the remote village in Alaska where the 2020 count officially began.

Story Archive

After former President Donald Trump signed a presidential memo in August 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau was directed to stop collecting payroll taxes from certain employees in the final months of last year. The bureau is now trying to get some former temporary workers to pay what they owe. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Susan Walsh/AP

Robert Santos, president of the American Statistical Association, has been approved to lead the U.S. Census Bureau as its new Senate-confirmed director through 2026. Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call via Getty Images

Dancers perform during a promotional event for the U.S. census in New York City's Times Square in September 2020. Brendan McDermid/Reuters hide caption

toggle caption
Brendan McDermid/Reuters

An artistic portrayal of the changing demographics of the United States. LA Johnson/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
LA Johnson/NPR

A person wearing a mask walks past posters encouraging census participation in Seattle in April 2020. The coronavirus pandemic has disrupted not only last year's national head count, but also a critical follow-up survey that the U.S. Census Bureau relies on to determine the tally's accuracy. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Ted S. Warren/AP

How many people of color did the 2020 census miss? COVID makes it harder to tell

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1043506293/1044542070" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Growing numbers of Latinos identifying as "Some other race" for the U.S. census have boosted the category to become the country's second-largest racial group after "White." Researchers are concerned the catchall grouping obscures many Latinx people's identities and does not produce the data needed to address racial inequities. Ada daSilva/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Ada daSilva/Getty Images

1 In 7 People Are 'Some Other Race' On The U.S. Census. That's A Big Data Problem

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1037352177/1042802630" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Daniel Wood/NPR

Most Prisoners Can't Vote, But They're Still Counted In Voting Districts

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1039643346/1039800097" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Allen Weisselberg (center), the longtime chief financial officer of former President Donald Trump's family business, stands behind Trump during a 2017 news conference at Trump Tower in New York City. Weisselberg, who appeared in court Monday, has pleaded not guilty to charges related to an alleged scheme to defraud taxpayers by paying Trump Organization executives with untaxed benefits. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Evan Vucci/AP

Trump's Business May Go On Trial On Tax Charges Just Before The 2022 Elections

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1037035597/1038854848" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People pass by a "Complete the census" sign along New York City's Hudson River Greenway in September 2020. Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexi Rosenfeld/Getty Images

Sam Catrambone clears debris away from a friend's home that was damaged by a tornado in Mullica Hill, N.J., on Thursday after record-breaking rainfall brought by the remnants of Hurricane Ida that swept through the area. Branden Eastwood/AFP via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Branden Eastwood/AFP via Getty Images

The Northeast Is Cleaning Up From Ida — But What Happens When The Next Storm Hits?

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1034137402/1034137403" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dozens Dead After Ida Remnants Flooded Areas Of The Northeast

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1033727581/1033727582" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Many at-home DNA ancestry testing kits require participants to mail in a sample of saliva. Cayce Clifford/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Cayce Clifford/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The Census Has Revealed A More Multiracial U.S. One Reason? Cheaper DNA Tests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/1030139666/1043279029" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript