Eleanor Beardsley Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture, and gastronomy.
Eleanor Beardsley
NPR

Eleanor Beardsley

Correspondent, Paris

Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture, and gastronomy. Since then, she has steadily worked her way to becoming an integral part of the NPR Europe reporting team.

Beardsley has been an active part of NPR's coverage of the two waves of terrorist attacks in Paris and in Brussels. She has also followed the migrant crisis, traveling to meet and report on arriving refugees in Hungary, Austria, Germany, Sweden, and France. She has also travelled to Ukraine, including the flashpoint eastern city of Donetsk, to report on the war there, and to Athens, to follow the Greek debt crisis.

In 2011 Beardsley covered the first Arab Spring revolution in Tunisia, where she witnessed the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. Since then she has returned to the North African country many times to follow its progress on the road to democracy.

In France, Beardsley covered both 2007 and 2012 French presidential elections. She also reported on the riots in French suburbs in 2005 and the massive student demonstrations in 2006. Beardsley has followed the Tour de France cycling race and been back to her old stomping ground — Kosovo — to report for NPR on three separate occasions.

Prior to moving to Paris, Beardsley worked for three years with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. She also worked as a television producer for French broadcaster TF1 in Washington, DC and as a staff assistant to Senator Strom Thurmond.

Reporting from France for Beardsley is the fulfillment of a lifelong passion for the French language and culture. At the age of 10 she began learning French by reading the Asterix The Gaul comic book series with her father.

While she came to the field of radio journalism relatively late in her career, Beardsley says her varied background, studies, and travels prepared her for the job as well as any journalism school. "I love reporting on the French because there are so many stereotypes about them that exist in America," she says. "Sometimes it's fun to dispel the false notions and show a different side of the Gallic character. And sometimes the old stereotypes do hold up. But whether Americans love or hate France and the French, they're always interested!"

A native of South Carolina, Beardsley has a Bachelor of Arts in European history and French from Furman University in Greenville, S.C., and a master's degree in International Business from the University of South Carolina.

Beardsley is interested in politics, travel, and observing foreign cultures. Her favorite cities are Paris and Istanbul.

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Story Archive

Didier Tass, behind the counter of his butcher shop, says he purchases meat from small farmers who raise cows and butcher them humanely and in small quantities. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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French Butchers Ask For Protection After Threats From Militant Vegans

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What France's World Cup Run Means For The Country's Minority Population

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Women Stage Their Own Tour De France On Same Route, With Tougher Conditions

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An undated photo, provided by family member Susan Lawrence, shows twin brothers Julius (left) and Ludwig Pieper in their U.S. Navy uniforms. Susan Lawrence via AP hide caption

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How A High Schooler Helped Reunite Twins 74 Years After Their World War II Deaths

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People in front of the Bataclan concert hall in Paris during the second anniversary of the terror attacks that occurred there on November 13, 2015. Stephane De Sakutin/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In The Shadow Of A Terrorist Attack, Rapper Is Targeted By France's Right Wing

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To Avoid EU Tariffs, Harley-Davidson Will Move Some Work Overseas

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Young soccer players practice at the Sarcelles A.A.S. complex in Sarcelles, France. Pete Kiehart for NPR hide caption

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France's World Cup Team Brings Positive Attention To Suburban Fans

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A Story Of Twins Reunited After Death

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France's 'Spiderman' Revs Up Debate Over Illegal Immigration

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A man flies the French tricolor flag over crowds marching to the Arc de Triomphe during the Paris students' strike. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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In France, The Protests Of May 1968 Reverberate Today — And Still Divide The French

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How Brexit Could Affect The Free Movement Of Goods Between U.K. And France

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China Is A Fast-Growing Presence In The World Of Cinema

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Cannes Film Festival Opens Amid #MeToo Movement

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Demonstrators hold signs against anti-Semitism during a silent march in Paris on March 28 in memory of Mireille Knoll, an 85-year-old Jewish woman murdered in her home in what police believe was an anti-Semitic attack. Knoll escaped the mass deportation of Jews from Paris during World War II. NurPhoto/NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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