Eleanor Beardsley Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture, and gastronomy.
Eleanor Beardsley
NPR

Eleanor Beardsley

Correspondent, Paris

Eleanor Beardsley began reporting from France for NPR in June 2004 as a freelance journalist, following all aspects of French society, politics, economics, culture, and gastronomy. Since then, she has steadily worked her way to becoming an integral part of the NPR Europe reporting team.

Beardsley has been an active part of NPR's coverage of the two waves of terrorist attacks in Paris and in Brussels. She has also followed the migrant crisis, traveling to meet and report on arriving refugees in Hungary, Austria, Germany, Sweden, and France. She has also travelled to Ukraine, including the flashpoint eastern city of Donetsk, to report on the war there, and to Athens, to follow the Greek debt crisis.

In 2011 Beardsley covered the first Arab Spring revolution in Tunisia, where she witnessed the overthrow of the autocratic President Zine el-Abidine Ben Ali. Since then she has returned to the North African country many times to follow its progress on the road to democracy.

In France, Beardsley covered both 2007 and 2012 French presidential elections. She also reported on the riots in French suburbs in 2005 and the massive student demonstrations in 2006. Beardsley has followed the Tour de France cycling race and been back to her old stomping ground — Kosovo — to report for NPR on three separate occasions.

Prior to moving to Paris, Beardsley worked for three years with the United Nations Mission in Kosovo. She also worked as a television producer for French broadcaster TF1 in Washington, DC and as a staff assistant to Senator Strom Thurmond.

Reporting from France for Beardsley is the fulfillment of a lifelong passion for the French language and culture. At the age of 10 she began learning French by reading the Asterix The Gaul comic book series with her father.

While she came to the field of radio journalism relatively late in her career, Beardsley says her varied background, studies, and travels prepared her for the job as well as any journalism school. "I love reporting on the French because there are so many stereotypes about them that exist in America," she says. "Sometimes it's fun to dispel the false notions and show a different side of the Gallic character. And sometimes the old stereotypes do hold up. But whether Americans love or hate France and the French, they're always interested!"

A native of South Carolina, Beardsley has a Bachelor of Arts in European history and French from Furman University in Greenville, S.C., and a master's degree in International Business from the University of South Carolina.

Beardsley is interested in politics, travel, and observing foreign cultures. Her favorite cities are Paris and Istanbul.

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Story Archive

Demonstrators including French trade union leader Philippe Martinez, center, protest against President Emmanuel Macron's fast-tracked labor law reforms on Sept. 12 in Paris. Christophe Morin/IP3/Getty Images hide caption

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Macron's Immigration Plan For France

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Parts Of Paris And Northern France Flooded After Unusually Heavy Rains

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Catherine Deneuve Apologizes To Victims Of Sexual Violence For Letter About #MeToo

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Station F, a massive startup incubator in Paris, gathers a whole entrepreneurial ecosystem under one roof. Bertrand Guay/Pool Photo via AP hide caption

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Wave Of Capitalist Optimism Sweeps Across Paris

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100 French Women Pen Letter Saying #MeToo Movement Has Gone Too Far

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French President Emmanuel Macron kisses Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo at Paris' city hall after his inauguration last May. Another French female mayor told her local council members in December she would no longer greet them with the traditional two-cheek kiss but, rather, with a handshake. Charles Platiau/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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France Ends State Of Emergency After Nearly 2 Years

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President Macron Promises Relief To Beleaguered French Suburbs

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Retired American photographer Tom Haley, 66, portrays Santa during a pageant in Normandy. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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How An American Became Santa In A Little Town In France

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France Considers Setting Minimum Consent Age For Having Sex

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French pop star Johnny Hallyday on stage at Paris' Palais Des Sports stadium in 1969. Reg Lancaster/Getty Images hide caption

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France Mourns Its Favorite Rock Star, Johnny Hallyday

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A water bottle is filled with sparkling water at a public fountain in a park in Paris. The city's mayor hopes the free bubbly water will help persuade residents to give up plastic bottles in favor of tap water. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

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To Burst The Bottle Bubble, Fountains In Paris Now Flow With Sparkling Water

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A woman reads a sign that says, "Due to a shortage of the raw material to make butter, we are not able to supply and sell you this product," attached to an empty refrigerated supermarket shelf in western France. Loic Venance/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sacré Beurre: France Faces A Butter Shortage

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